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Published by Guy Basso

Tuesday 23 January 2018 - Friday 26 January 2018

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  • The SHOT Show is the largest and most comprehensive trade show for all professionals involved with the shooting sports, hunting and law enforcement industries.
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    • Melvin Forbes with the rifle that changed his life, altered rifle history and that was a hit at the 1985 SHOT Show.

      From its humble beginnings in St. Louis, in 1979, to taking every nook and cranny of the Sands Expo Center in 2017, the SHOT Show is the industry’s signature event, bringing together more than 1,700 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees. Next January, SHOT Show will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary, so we asked a handful of today’s top outdoor writers to pick two exhibitors they know well to tell their SHOT Show stories. Fourth in our new “Blast from the Past” series, the well-regarded scribe Richard Mann speaks with New Ultra Light Arms’ Melvin Forbes. Enjoy! — Chris Dolnack, NSSF Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer

      Two years after I graduated high school, a shop teacher from West Virginia introduced a bolt-action rifle to the world at the 1985 SHOT Show. That rifle forever changed the landscape of sporting rifles, because it weighed less than five pounds and shot with the precision of a Benchrest wonder gun. I lusted for one of those rifles in the most sinful ways for nearly 20 years, until I finally had enough money to buy one. Now I own five.

      Melvin Forbes, of the company now known as New Ultra Light Arms, has been building that same rifle for 33 years. During that time, he has never missed attending SHOT Show, where, with his remarkable creation, he amazes those who walk into his booth. Other companies have tried to copy his rifle, other companies have even bought Melvin’s company and tried to build his rifle. They have all failed—but Melvin and his rifle remain. You might be able to learn a thing or two from Melvin. I know I have.

      Richard Mann (RM): Melvin, tell me about your first SHOT Show?

      A SHOT Show veteran of 33 years, Melvin Forbes is seen here at work in his shop in the hills of West Virginia, where he still builds some of the best rifles money can buy.

      Melvin Forbes (MF): It was January of 1985, in Atlanta. I remember I was looking for furniture for the booth, and asked a guy how much it would cost. When he told me, I said, “I don’t want to buy it, I just want to rent it!” He said, “You are renting it. Welcome to show business.”

      We incorporated Ultra Light Arms in September of 1984. When I decided to attend SHOT Show, I had four complete rifles and was out of cash. I wrote letters to all the magazine editors and big-name gun writers of the time, told them we were building a .308 Winchester rifle that weighed 4.5 pounds, had a composite stock, a Douglas barrel and a Timney trigger. Jim Carmichael with “Outdoor Life” was the only one who responded. Twenty minutes after the 1985 SHOT Show opened on the first day, Carmichael came by the booth wanting to look at the rifle.

      I then spent the rest of that SHOT Show grabbing the writers I recognized as they walked by. I remember one even covered his badge and turned his head as he passed the booth.

      Melvin Forbes and his wife, Patty, receiving the NRA Golden Bullseye Award in 2011. Patty has been Melvin’s constant companion at SHOT Show.

      RM: How important was that first SHOT Show, with regards to the success of your company?

      MF: Our success was totally dependent on the show. The first day back in the shop, Carmichael called, but I was out of the shop. I was excited to call him the next morning, but figured I ought to wait until at least 8:00 a.m. About 20 minutes after 7:00, my phone rang, and it was Jim. He said, “I thought you were going to call me this morning.” I told him I was waiting for a reasonable hour and he said, “I’ve been up since six.” I told him I had too, we laughed, and he said he wanted to include my rifle in “Outdoor Life’s” list of new guns for 1985. When that issue came out, they published a picture of my rifle, and Carmichael had written something like, “Get used to the name Ultra Light Arms, they are going to make some noise,” and the phone started ringing off the hook. Carmichael was right.

      RM: What is your best SHOT Show memory?

      MF: The opportunity to have had a conversation with fellow West Virginian and legend, General Chuck Yeager. I remember he was standing at a bar. I gathered up all my gumption, pulled my britches up tight, walked right up to him and nervously said, “General Yeager, my name is Melvin Forbes and I want to shake your hand.” Yeager glared at me, squeezed my hand, and said, “You build guns.” I was floored.

      RM: What SHOT Show mistakes have you made or moment you had that made you realize you might should have done something differently?

      MF: I should have gone to a 10×20-foot booth sooner. It would have helped me build priority points and move up the ladder. That allows you to pick a better booth each year. After I increased the booth size and got those points, I started selecting end-cap booths, which provide more prominence; you get traffic from more than one direction. It’s all about visibility. If those attending SHOT Show do not see you, you cannot talk to them.

      The New Ultra Light Arms Model 20. A less than five-pound .308 Winchester with a 22-inch barrel that’s capable of tack-driving accuracy.

      RM: What advice do you have for other start-up and small companies/manufacturers when it comes to making the most of SHOT Show?

      The author’s son with a springbok in Africa. New Ultra Light Arms rifles are generational; this rifle belonged to his father.

      MF: Be prepared to spend the money. Take advantage of all of the various nuances of the show. Purchase banner ads and get your name out. And don’t snub opportunities to meet and dine with other SHOT Show attendees. That’s how I got to be lifelong friends with Bob Nosler and Bill Jordan.

      You also have to have a good pair of shoes. If you’re going to be the face of the company, you have to be available from the time the show opens until it closes, because somebody’s going to walk by and want to talk to you. You better be there and you better be on your feet, smiling. Also, all along I knew I could not afford high-dollar ads in the magazines, so I put efforts into building relationships with writers and editors.

      ***

      Melvin Forbes and the author with a New Mexico bull elk taken with a New Ultra Light Arms Model 20 in .308 Winchester.

      The company Melvin Forbes started in 1985 made such an impact on the firearms industry, almost every rifle manufacturer tried to offer a similar gun. In 1999, Forbes sold Ultra Light Arms to Colt’s, and, in 2000, the company went bankrupt. Forbes had to buy his company back and had to add “New” to the company name. Again, this time in 2010, Melvin sold his company to Forbes Rifles, which kept him on as a consultant. But the new owners didn’t listen to Melvin, and in just a few years that business, too, became defunct. New Ultra Light Arms is now back under the control of the man who started the company, a true legend in the firearms industry and a man who has consecutively attended 33 SHOT Shows! Make sure to stop by his booth at the 2018 show—he’s always worth your time.

      The post SHOT Show 40th Anniversary — Blast From the Past: New Ultra Light Arms appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      Melvin Forbes with the rifle that changed his life, altered rifle history and that was a hit at the 1985 SHOT Show.

      From its humble beginnings in St. Louis, in 1979, to taking every nook and cranny of the Sands Expo Center in 2017, the SHOT Show is the industry’s signature event, bringing together more than 1,700 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees. Next January, SHOT Show will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary, so we asked a handful of today’s top outdoor writers to pick two ... See more
      See more on line
      SHOT Show 40th Anniversary — Blast From the Past: New Ultra Light Arms
    • The tremendous success of the Supplier Showcase at the 2017 SHOT Show strongly demonstrated that our manufacturers are constantly looking for new material suppliers and opportunities to connect with trending innovation and products — that means SHOT Show is the marketplace for all members of our industry.

      The 2017 Supplier Showcase featured more than 260 third-party OEM suppliers who networked with more than 2,500 firearms industry exhibitors and their design and engineering professionals. You told us you wanted more, so to meet this demand, the 2018 Supplier Showcase has been expanded to two full days, now encompassing both Monday and Tuesday of SHOT Week.

      As of this posting, we have more than 300 third-party suppliers registered to participate in 2018, and space assignments begin for those vendors in a few weeks. We’ve increased the available space in the Venetian to accommodate the newly expanded Supplier Showcase, so if you as an exhibitor or product designer have suppliers or service providers in your network who may want to participate, please pass along the link www.SHOTShow.com/suppliershowcase to them immediately and have them sign up now before space runs out. You can also provide them this video, which provides an excellent overview of what took place during the 2017 Supplier Showcase.

      Finally, as an exhibitor, please plan now to have the appropriate engineers, designers and procurement personnel on your staff scheduled to be in Las Vegas to take part in SHOT Week when the Supplier Showcase is taking place on Jan. 22-23, 2018. For more information, click here or call SHOT Show Management at 702-216-5847.

      The post Expanded Supplier Showcase Returning for 2018 SHOT Show appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      The tremendous success of the Supplier Showcase at the 2017 SHOT Show strongly demonstrated that our manufacturers are constantly looking for new material suppliers and opportunities to connect with trending innovation and products — that means SHOT Show is the marketplace for all members of our industry.

      The 2017 Supplier Showcase featured more than 260 third-party OEM suppliers who networked with more than 2,500 firearms industry exhibitors and their design and engineering ... See more
      See more on line
      Expanded Supplier Showcase Returning for 2018 SHOT Show
    • There are dozens of pros and cons to leasing your retail or range space, just as there are to buying space. How do you sift through the legalese to secure a space that’s right for your business now and in the future? Business expert Robbie Brown has the answer, and he’ll be telling you all about them in the session “Buying Versus Leasing — Everything in Life is Negotiable,” part of the Retailer 101 learning track in the 2018 SHOT Show University.

      In this fast-paced session, Brown will cover the numerous topics and questions on leasing versus buying your storefront, including:

      - After 10 years, is it better to have ownership equity or just a pile of rent receipts?
      - Can you maneuver out of a lease obligation?
      - Cash flow and equity concerns.
      - Monthly payment tax deductions.
      - The roles demographics, the economy, interest rates, time horizons and your plans for additional stores play in your rent versus buy decision.
      - Ability to negotiate a favorable purchase price or lease rents and provisions.
      Robbie Brown

      Robbie Brown has an extensive background in retailing, wholesaling, distribution service industries, and consulting. He has been CEO of numerous companies in the shooting sports industry, including retail chains and distribution companies. He currently consults for businesses of all sizes in both the merchandise and service industries, as well as for a variety of corporations, industry groups and trade associations. Brown is a frequent roundtable moderator and speaker before industry trade shows, conventions and other corporate groups, and he has published more than 300 business-related articles, delivered hundreds of speeches and served as a business advisor to many CEOs both inside and outside of the firearms industry.

      Taking place Monday, January 22, the day before the 2018 SHOT Show opens, SHOT Show University is NSSF’s premier learning experience for retailers and range owners, providing business owners of all experience levels ways to improve their businesses. The forum is comprised of four learning tracks: Range, Compliance, Retailer 101 and the Master’s Class. Though anyone can attend any learning track, those with newly established FFL businesses, those looking to explore firearms retailing or firearms range businesses for the first time and those looking to expand their footprints with additional locations are especially encouraged to participate in the Retailer 101 track.

      Registration for the 2018 SHOT Show is scheduled to open in early October. Buyers and range owners successfully registering to attend the show can then register to participate in SHOT Show University and other events. NSSF Members receive a discount on their registration fee to attend SHOT Show University. For more information and to see the full SHOT Show University agenda and speaker lineup, go to www.SHOTShow.org and click on the “Attendees” heading at the top of the page.

      Sponsorship opportunities are available for SHOT Show University and other SHOT Week events. Contact Chris Tatulli, NSSF Director, Exhibit and Sponsorship Sales, at ctatulli@nssf.org to learn more about our wide variety of sponsorship options.

      The post Should You Lease or Buy Your Retail Space? 2018 SHOT Show University Provides the Answers appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      There are dozens of pros and cons to leasing your retail or range space, just as there are to buying space. How do you sift through the legalese to secure a space that’s right for your business now and in the future? Business expert Robbie Brown has the answer, and he’ll be telling you all about them in the session “Buying Versus Leasing — Everything in Life is Negotiable,” part of the Retailer 101 learning track in the 2018 SHOT Show University.

      In this fast-paced session, ... See more
      See more on line
      Should You Lease or Buy Your Retail Space? 2018 SHOT Show University Provides the Answers
    • Limited Space Available for Other Exhibits
      Our friends at CMG Marketing & Events and Triple Curl PR & Advertising have announced that they are extending an invitation to the manufacturers of products such as pepper spray, stun guns and other goods the firearms industry refers to as the category of “less-lethal” products to exhibit in an all-new display area designed just for them and being added to the 2018 Industry Day at the Range. The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF), the trade association for the firearms industry, is the Title Sponsor of Industry Day at the Range, which will take place on Monday, Jan. 22, the day before the opening day of 2018 SHOT Show, at the Boulder Rifle and Pistol Club.

      According to a recent Industry Day at the Range press release, the new Less-Lethal area will allow a fresh category of manufacturers an opportunity to demonstrate their product to the more than 1,600 media and buyers in attendance at Industry Day. This exhibit opportunity is being offered to the manufacturers of pepper spray, restraints, lighting, protective gear, diversion devices, stun devices, batons and similarly related products at a special rate.

      “The use of these special technologies is a great benefit for law enforcement, corrections, and military professionals,” says Kelsey Puryear, Manager of Industry Day at the Range. “We are excited that we can provide these manufacturers with an opportunity to showcase their products at Industry Day.”

      Exhibiting companies begin to receive media coverage the moment the day starts and continue to receive additional exposure during SHOT Show and throughout the year. Exhibitors get a jump on their competition with early exposure to their most important accounts and a chance to get excellent coverage from print, digital, broadcast and social media outlets. Industry Day at the Range is open to members of the outdoor media and select buyers via invitation only.

      Exhibitors of less-lethal products interested in participating in the 2018 Industry Day at the Range may view pricing and details on what is included in each exhibit here. Tent space for non-shooting companies and areas for on- and off-road vehicles, shotgun clay target, airgun and archery demo space also remain available. Pistol, rifle and full auto shooting positions are now sold out. Industry Day at the Range encourages all exhibitors planning to display at this event to register now to ensure the media and buyers you want in attendance are invited. Registration will close Sept. 29, 2017, unless space sells out sooner. For more information, visit www.SHOTShowRangeDay.com or contact Kelsey Puryear at Kelsey@cmgmarketingandevents.com.

      The post 2018 Industry Day at the Range New Less-Lethal Product Area Open for Exhibitor Registration appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      Limited Space Available for Other Exhibits
      Our friends at CMG Marketing & Events and Triple Curl PR & Advertising have announced that they are extending an invitation to the manufacturers of products such as pepper spray, stun guns and other goods the firearms industry refers to as the category of “less-lethal” products to exhibit in an all-new display area designed just for them and being added to the 2018 Industry Day at the Range. The National Shooting Sports Foundation ... See more
      See more on line
      2018 Industry Day at the Range New Less-Lethal Product Area Open for Exhibitor Registration
    • I am pleased to announce that the online Exhibitor Resource Center at SHOTShow.org is now fully updated and available for use by our 2018 SHOT Show exhibitors.

      A one-stop shop for any and everything exhibitors need to prepare for the show, succeed through the show and capitalize on opportunities post-show, the Exhibitor Resource Center for 2018 features a number of user-friendly functionality enhancements, including:

      - A global search bar at the top helps find anything you might be looking for.
      - A comprehensive deadline checklist for all exhibitor necessities, including ads and sponsorships, show floor vehicle permitting, lead retrieval and A/V product rentals, furniture reservations and much more. Reminders can be automatically synced to your email, Apple, Outlook or Google calendars.
      - The wide-ranging Budget Checklist worksheet lists dozens of areas exhibitors should consider when planning for their time on the SHOT Show floor, including marketing, freight and shipping, staff expenses, booth design and others.
      - Dedicated logistics and Exhibitor Appointed Contractor listings.
      We are a little less than two months away from registration opening for the 2018 SHOT Show, and that means anyone planning to attend the show is deep in planning mode, especially our exhibitors. I encourage all our exhibitors to bookmark and visit their Exhibitor Resource Center often, use the built-in reminder functions to streamline your logistics and explore the dozens of assets available there that can help you have not just a great show experience, but one that allows you to stand out from the crowd. Go to SHOTShow.org, and hover over the “Exhibitor” heading at the top of the page. You’ll find the link to your Exhibitor Resource Center in the dropdown menu under the green “Exhibitor Tools” heading.

      The post 2018 SHOT Show Exhibitor Resource Center Goes Live appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      I am pleased to announce that the online Exhibitor Resource Center at SHOTShow.org is now fully updated and available for use by our 2018 SHOT Show exhibitors.

      A one-stop shop for any and everything exhibitors need to prepare for the show, succeed through the show and capitalize on opportunities post-show, the Exhibitor Resource Center for 2018 features a number of user-friendly functionality enhancements, ... See more
      See more on line
      2018 SHOT Show Exhibitor Resource Center Goes Live
    • Photo (above): Redding Reloading Equipment’s headquarters in Cortland, New York

      From its humble beginnings in St. Louis, in 1979, to taking every nook and cranny of the Sands Expo Center in 2017, the SHOT Show is the industry’s signature event, bringing together more than 1,700 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees. Next January, SHOT Show will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary, so we asked a handful of today’s top outdoor writers to pick two exhibitors they know well to tell their SHOT Show stories. Third in our new “Blast from the Past” series is Redding Reloading Equipment with the company’s long-time Executive Vice President and industry veteran Robin Sharpless, interviewed by the inimitable Wayne van Zwoll. Enjoy! — Chris Dolnack, NSSF Senior VicePresident and Chief Marketing Officer

      Robin Sharpless, Redding Reloading Equipment
      Redding has attended all 40 SHOT Shows. The firm’s Executive Vice President, Robin Sharpless, counts 28 for himself, though first with other firms. “SHOT is Redding’s most important event by far,” he told me. “It’s our entry to markets worldwide!”

      The Place for International Outreach
      Founded in 1946, Redding Reloading Equipment of Cortland, New York, appeared on my radar shortly after Richard Beebe bought the firm in 1974. He shared loading data with me for his wildcat .270 Redding cartridge.

      A member of NSSF since Richard attended the first SHOT Show in 1979, Redding hasn’t missed one since! Sharpless has an unbroken attendance record since 1991, when he represented gunmaker H&R at SHOT Show. After H&R sold to Marlin eight years later, Sharpless moved to New York, from his native New Jersey, for a stint with Ithaca. Six years at Cheytac followed. Now, after a decade at Redding’s helm, Robin modestly credits much of the firm’s steady growth to SHOT Show.

      “We not only meet with U.S. dealers there, Redding earns or confirms its international business at SHOT Show,” explained Sharpless. “We don’t even attend IWA, SHOT Show’s smaller, European equivalent in Germany. The people who sell Redding products know they must attend SHOT Show. We have customers in Belarus and Ukraine, in New Zealand and New Caledonia. SHOT Show’s international credibility enables us to market from Iceland to South Africa at our booth. In fact, I view off-shore sales as our biggest growth opportunity.”

      My, How Things Have Changed!
      “Some would say SHOT Show has become too big. Acreage and attendance do challenge people bent on visiting each booth. There’s less time for chats. Meetings keep some executives off the floor entirely. It’s a less casual show now,” said Sharpless. “But more people can mean more business, and a bigger show is a bigger draw for international buyers. NSSF has done a fine job of managing the increased traffic. This event is costly and time-consuming for attendees; I think most welcome current efforts to tighten vetting. Our customers do too. We’re all pleased SHOT Show is still professionally run and focused on business.”

      The value of the fast-growing “tactical” section? Robin concedes that some displays have little to do with traditional views of shooting, hunting and the outdoors. “But competitive shooting events — action pistol to long-range rifle — share gear and tactics with this corner of the industry. So does the self-defense market. Lines blur between service pistols, match-ready .45s and bedside semiautos, between sniper rifles and the ARs and long-range precision rifles in civilian safes. We’ve worked to dispel the image of Redding as a Benchrest supply house. The larger shooting community welcomes our products as top-end must-haves, while our younger customers favor firearms of little interest to veteran shooters who teethed on tube-fed lever rifles. But such shifts in the market present new opportunities for nimble companies like ours.”

      Always a Memory Maker
      Now 60, Sharpless has two daughters, the eldest beginning a pharmacy career at Johns Hopkins pediatric hospital.

      “She’s in rare company. We’re mighty proud of her. But she reminds me of my age and how the industry has changed. I got my first hunting license when I turned 10, with a Model 94 Stevens .410 and an Irish setter pup. Then hunters wore red plaid, not camo. Competitive shooters used walnut-stocked bolt rifles … . Okay, I wax nostalgic. No apologies. People at SHOT Show have become a second family. Some are gone – stalwarts like “Gun Digest’s” Ken Warner, who mentored me when I was a fresh face. New customers and new products may fuel our industry, but other generations gave it footing.”

      Some SHOT Show contacts can blur in memory, though.

      “At one party long ago, the Margaritas were getting drained like lemonade on a hot day behind a hay baler. A well-known gun writer requested a new firearm for review. It was shipped promptly on the heels of SHOT Show. The manufacturer got a note in return: ‘Why did you send me this gun?’”

      Every SHOT Show rookie stumbles, and though the 2018 show will be Sharplesss twenty-ninth, he was once new to the show. I asked him for wisdom he could impart to others and perhaps spare them some pain.

      “I learned the perils of assumption at those early shows,” he explained. “Near the end of one show, I volunteered to stay and pack the gun crates for return shipment. The show dissolved around me as I waited. And waited. At 3:00 a.m. the crates arrived … . Needless to say, I check the move-out schedules a lot more closely these days.”

      As to venues, Sharpless said, “Las Vegas is a natural, one of few places with the facilities to host SHOT Show at its present size. Sticking with one city makes SHOT Show easy for attendees; they learn routes, hotels, restaurants, the show floor. Still, I’d like to see Orlando back on the schedule. We saw dealers, especially proprietors of small shops, who would never visit Vegas. The Southeast is a big market for Redding. Orlando SHOT Shows were a short drive from millions of people. For us, Florida and Nevada events became SHOT Show East and SHOT Show West. We earned business at one event that we’d miss at the other.”

      In recent years, Sharpless has held the same spot on the show floor.

      “We once had to apply for a location each year; now NSSF lets us stay in one place — and I’m delighted! People know where to find us, and I like Redding’s aisle-end location. Close to the main entrance, it’s even closer to the LE room that opens an hour earlier than the main floor. Everyone passes our booth – most of them several times!”

      No booth babes?

      “We’ve never tried to draw attention with pretty young models. It seems at odds with making the shooting sports more appealing to women. Besides, most of our customers know a good deal about guns. Have a question on case-forming for a Gibbs wildcat? You won’t learn much from a girl hired locally for her figure.”

      Ready for the Future
      The industry will continue to evolve as on-line sales increase for items not requiring FFLs.

      “We can adapt,” said Sharpless, “though I rue the passing of mom-and-pop gun shops, the small-town stores that sold firearms and ammo but also fishing tackle, hardware, horse tack and gopher bait. The classic gun shop of my youth was run by a crotchety old fellow who worked on guns. When in the mood, he’d spin out more than you thought anyone could know of rifles discontinued for decades, and handloading data as if reading from a chart. The general store was a gathering place for the community. People gossiped as they shopped, made plans for the weekend and, well, showed they cared for each other. Now so much industry business goes to web-order houses with gross sales of many millions. The net-worth gap between these and traditional local shops — which Redding still serves — has become a chasm.”

      How should SHOT Show adapt?

      “NSSF is guiding the show deftly, in my view,” Sharpless replied. “It has smart people in charge. I expect as SHOT Show grows, they’ll manage it well and preserve its business focus. But I hope, too, that we attendees don’t become so professional that numbers alone define our success, that we can’t still reconnect as friends at SHOT Show.”

      Robin Sharpless, Redding’s Executive Vice President

      Robin Sharpless comes by his career honestly. Fifty years a firearms enthusiast, he’s a past board member of the NRA. But Robin has also raced motorcycles and now treats his youngest daughter to rides on a Harley-Davidson Road King, one of five Harleys in his garage.

      “I’m eyeing a Buell now,” he sighs. “A 1200 V-twin Ulysses. Built only between 2005 and 2010. This one’s pristine. Just 14,000 miles. But it will come very dear.” Motorcycle buffs and gun cranks have much in common!

      The post SHOT Show 40th Anniversary — Blast From the Past: Redding Reloading Equipment appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      Photo (above): Redding Reloading Equipment’s headquarters in Cortland, New York

      From its humble beginnings in St. Louis, in 1979, to taking every nook and cranny of the Sands Expo Center in 2017, the SHOT Show is the industry’s signature event, bringing together more than 1,700 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees. Next January, SHOT Show will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary, so we asked a handful of today’s top outdoor writers to pick two exhibitors they know well to ... See more
      See more on line
      SHOT Show 40th Anniversary — Blast From the Past: Redding Reloading Equipment
    • Football camps are open and the first days of a new school year are just around the corner. This time of year also means all of us here at NSSF will be moving into SHOT Show mode 24/7 in just weeks. Our top order, and yours, right now is the final booth payments due date.

      Those exhibitors with a balance remaining on their accounts received an email about the final balance due yesterday, July 31. To reiterate for those who didn’t see the email, your full balance must post to your account no later than this Friday, August 4.

      Please note it is too late to use regular mail. Your final payment should be made by credit card through your Exhibitor Dashboard (instructions were sent in previous emails), no later than August 3,  or by overnight payments or wire transfers no later than August 2, to ensure your account is credited by the August 4 deadline. If you have questions regarding access to your dashboard, please contact Exhibitor Services at 855-355-7468 or email ExhibitorHelp@SHOTShow.org.

      As always thank you for your continuing support. Summer is moving too quickly, and I hope you’re finding time for a needed recharge. We’re all looking forward to seeing you at the 40th Annual SHOT Show.

      The post Final Booth Payment Deadline is Here appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      Football camps are open and the first days of a new school year are just around the corner. This time of year also means all of us here at NSSF will be moving into SHOT Show mode 24/7 in just weeks. Our top order, and yours, right now is the final booth payments due date.

      Those exhibitors with a balance remaining on their accounts received an email about the final balance due yesterday, July 31. To reiterate for those who didn’t see the email, your full balance must post to your ... See more
      See more on line
      Final Booth Payment Deadline is Here
    • From its humble beginnings in St. Louis, in 1979, to taking every nook and cranny of the Sands Expo Center in 2017, the SHOT Show is the industry’s signature event, bringing together more than 1,700 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees. Next January, SHOT Show will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary, so we asked a handful of today’s top outdoor writers to pick two exhibitors they know well to tell their SHOT Show stories. Second in our new “Blast from the Past” series is Sturm, Ruger & Co., with the company’s long-time engineer and SHOT Show exhibitor Mark Gurney, interviewed by none other than industry veteran Craig Boddington. Enjoy! — Chris Dolnack, NSSF Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer

      Sturm, Ruger, and Company
      Sturm, Ruger, and Company has been a prominent exhibitor at the SHOT Show since the very beginning. But the company’s leadership has changed over time, and Bill Ruger’s family is no longer directly involved. I thought it would be interesting to interview one of Ruger’s mid-level managers. Mark Gurney is no rookie; he’s been with Ruger for 23 years, advancing from the engineering side in Ruger’s Pine Tree Castings to his current job as Director of Product Management. This means that he started out behind the scenes, producing components for firearms that were first seen at SHOT — and for more than a decade, now, facing the industry and the public at SHOT.

      Craig Boddington (CB): Mark, your first SHOT Show was in 2006. What was your impression?

      Mark Gurney (MG): I was amazed at how big it was, business to business. The enormity of SHOT was almost incomprehensible.

      CB: With 11 shows under your belt, is there any show in particular that stands out as the best and if so, why?

      Mark Gurney’s best-remembered SHOT Show introduction was in 2009, when Ruger’s Light Compact Revolver (LCR) made its first appearance. Although a departure from traditional revolver designs, the LCR was, and still is, a runaway success.

      MG: The 2009 SHOT Show in Orlando! That was the show when we launched the LCR. Frankly we weren’t certain how the public would accept such a departure from traditional revolver designs. But the reception was fantastic! I remember retailers walking into our booth, picking up the little LCR, and seeing their eyebrows raise when they felt how light it is, and then a big smile when they worked the trigger for the first time. I will never forget that show!

      CB: What products were introduced at SHOT that became a “thing,” that became an iconic product for Ruger?

      MG: Well, we talked about the LCR. When we did our VOC (Voice of Customer) early on, some retailers were skeptical, and we were a little apprehensive. But at three-quarters of a million revolvers sold, I guess you could say it became a “thing.”

      The LCR was a spectacular introduction for Ruger, but so was the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle in 2011. We expected that rifle to do well as a nice variant of the M77 Hawkeye, but we were pleasantly surprised when it brought what was supposed to be a niche product well into the mainstream. It remains a solid citizen in the Hawkeye lineup.

      At SHOT in 2012, we introduced the Ruger American Rifle — you helped us, Craig, with VOC on that one — and the same year we launched the SR22 Pistol. Both those new products are made and sold right alongside the legacy Hawkeye and Mark III (now Mark IV) lines and they all do quite well for us.

      CB: What’s the funniest thing that ever happened to you at a SHOT Show?

      Ruger’s Gunsite Scout Rifle, introduced in 2012, uses the M77 Hawkeye modified to Jeff Cooper’s concept of a “scout rifle.” The AI-style magazine proved necessary for smooth feeding, a choice that lead to one of Gurney’s most memorable SHOT Show encounters.

      MG: Well, I’m not sure it’s funny, but facing the public is sometimes a daunting task. I was involved in developing on the Ruger Gunsite Scout Rifle. As much as we wanted to, we just couldn’t get the standard M14 magazines to work consistently with our controlled round feed action; there was too much variance in the magazine feed lip geometry. But we found AI-style magazines to be very consistent and reliable. So, at the Scout’s first SHOT Show, a gentleman came to me and said, “What moron decided not to use the M14 magazine? He needs to be fired!”

      Steeling up my courage, I replied, “Sir, that would be me.” I thought my explanation was reasonable, but he wasn’t convinced.

      The rest of the conversation didn’t go very well, but the next day the same gent came back and said, “I was a jerk yesterday. I’m sorry.”

      I’m pretty sure his wife prompted him to the apology, which really wasn’t necessary, but was nice to hear.

      CB: Can you think of a rookie mistake you made as an exhibitor?

      MG: I’m from New Hampshire, cold country, and I’m an outdoor athlete — I ride my bike all through the winter. SHOT Show in Las Vegas is usually pleasant, but I remember one Industry Day at the Range event when the temperature plummeted and the wind was blowing — I spilled coffee and it instantly froze. I wasn’t prepared, and I’ve never been so cold. I got back to my hotel and stood under a hot shower for a long time, and was still chilled to the bone. Advice? Bring a warm winter coat to Range Day. The worst that will happen is you won’t need it.”

      CB: How do you view the SHOT Show as key to your business?

      MG: I’ll use the words of our new CEO, Chris Killoy. He insists that we are there to visit with our customers, with priority on smaller retailers, America’s gun shop owners. For them, going to SHOT is a big deal, and we try to make them our priority at SHOT. Obviously, the big retailers and distributors are there, and we’ll make time for them, but there are other times to work with them, as well. Obviously, it’s about other things, too. Today, social media is huge, and we have folks showing up at the booth with everything from an iPhone to a mobile studio. We try really hard to accommodate everyone, but our doctrine is that SHOT is for our core retail customers, and SHOT is our best chance to work directly with them.

      The post SHOT Show 40th Anniversary — Blast From the Past: Ruger appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      From its humble beginnings in St. Louis, in 1979, to taking every nook and cranny of the Sands Expo Center in 2017, the SHOT Show is the industry’s signature event, bringing together more than 1,700 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees. Next January, SHOT Show will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary, so we asked a handful of today’s top outdoor writers to pick two exhibitors they know well to tell their SHOT Show stories. Second in our new “Blast from the Past” series is Sturm, Ruger & ... See more
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      SHOT Show 40th Anniversary — Blast From the Past: Ruger
    • The newest enhancement to the marketing package included with all completed exhibitor applications is the ability to upload your company logo through your exhibitor dashboard. That logo will be displayed in the SHOT Show Planner, on the SHOT Show Mobile App, in the printed Official SHOT Show Directory and on the Wayfinder screens during the Show.

      Uploading your logo is easy. Here’s how:

      - Login in to your Exhibitor Dashboard.
      - Click on “Edit Profile,” then “Company Logo”
      - You will upload two separate logo files, one for online use and one for print.- Online logos must be RGB (no CMYK) and smaller than 2 MB. File type can be .gif, .jpg or .png. The optimal dimensions are 288 pixels wide x 72 pixels high. This is the logo that will appear in the SHOT Show Planner and on the SHOT Show Mobile App. It is strongly suggested you name this logo “YourCompanyNameONLINE.jpg” or something similar.
      - The logo for use in print publications must be CMYK, 300 dpi and 1½ x 1½ inches. File type can be .eps, .ai, .jpg, .png or .psd. You must name this file the same as your company name; “YourCompanyNamePRINT.gif” for example. The print logo will appear with your Official SHOT Show Directory listing.

      - Click “Choose File” next to each type and proceed to upload your file.
      - When done, click “Save & Continue.”
      One final note: For those companies that will be debuting new logos at the 2018 SHOT Show but not beforehand, you can certainly upload those new logos for print publication without worry about a premature release. The uploads are secure and your logo will not appear in print materials available to the trade or public before the 2018 SHOT Show opens. Online logos can be updated at any time, so we would advise you upload your current logo now, then make a note to update that digital logo in January prior to the start of the show as necessary.

      Have questions or need help with your logo upload? Contact Exhibitor Services at 855-355-7468 or email ExhibitorHelp@SHOTShow.org.

      The post Company Logo Upload Newest Marketing Feature for Exhibitors appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      The newest enhancement to the marketing package included with all completed exhibitor applications is the ability to upload your company logo through your exhibitor dashboard. That logo will be displayed in the SHOT Show Planner, on the SHOT Show Mobile App, in the printed Official SHOT Show Directory and on the Wayfinder screens during the Show.

      Uploading your logo is easy. Here’s how:

      - Login in to your ... See more
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      Company Logo Upload Newest Marketing Feature for Exhibitors
    • In 2017, the SHOT Show evolved into SHOT Week. We now have a host of pre-show events, such as the Suppliers Showcase and HAVA golf tournament, not to mention the wealth of educational forums and other centers of interest during the show week itself. That means there’s a lot of competition for attention — and that means each exhibitor has to find a way to stand out.

      Our soft-cover publication SHOT Show Tracker has proven time and again to be key to exhibitors looking to grab the attention of the thousands of buyers and media members attending the show. The Tracker is the only SHOT print medium sent to your prospective customers before the Show. Mailed to every attendee pre-registered for the show — or more than 90 percent of all attendees — the Tracker is a catalog of all events taking place before and during the show, the full list of educational seminars and floor plans, attendance rules among a host of other information. The digital version of the Tracker is also found on the SHOT Show website.

      With more and more attendees mapping out how they’ll spend their week at SHOT well ahead of the show, and also planning on spending the full week in Vegas, the Tracker in recent years has risen to must-have status for thousands of attendees. And because this is a pre-show planning tool, ads placed in it get noticed — and that’s something that can greatly enhance traffic to your booth.

      Print ad options include:

      - Full page 4-color
      - Half-page 4-color
      - Three-quarter page back cover
      - Inside front and inside back covers
      Special placements are also available. To learn how an ad in the SHOT Show Tracker can boost your booth traffic and improve your lead generation, contact me at djeanneatte@nssf.org, or Chris Tatulli, NSSF Director, Exhibit & Conference Sales, at ctatulli@nssf.org.

      **Special!** Mention this blog and receive a 10-percent discount on your Tracker ad if placed by August 15, 2017. Save even more ($2,000-plus) by combining your Tracker ad with the Official SHOT Show Directory and New Product Center Guide ad(s).

      The post SHOT Show Exhibitors: Get Noticed Early and Often appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2017.
      In 2017, the SHOT Show evolved into SHOT Week. We now have a host of pre-show events, such as the Suppliers Showcase and HAVA golf tournament, not to mention the wealth of educational forums and other centers of interest during the show week itself. That means there’s a lot of competition for attention — and that means each exhibitor has to find a way to stand out.

      Our soft-cover publication SHOT Show Tracker has proven time and again to be key to exhibitors looking to grab the ... See more
      See more on line
      SHOT Show Exhibitors: Get Noticed Early and Often
    • At the 2017 SHOT Show in Las Vegas, we launched our first Supplier Showcase as a way to better connect our manufacturing exhibitors with third-party material and service providers essential to their processes. It was an astounding success, with more than 260 vendors displaying and nearly 3,000 CEOs, procurement specialists, engineers, product designers and others in attendance.

      Feedback from the event from both suppliers and our manufacturing exhibitors was so positive we’re now making this a two-day event for the 2018 SHOT Show, and we’ve just opened registration for any and all third-party suppliers of materials and services to the firearms manufacturing trade. These include suppliers of extrusions, fabrication processes, fabrics, machinery, metals, plastics, tooling and those providing software and logistical support services.

      Vendor registration is open to both NSSF Associate Members (our membership tier created specifically for third-party companies regularly engaged in supplying goods and/or services directly to businesses in the firearms, ammunition, hunting and shooting sports industry) and non-members, and NSSF Members receive a substantial discount on the registration fee ($2,250 versus $2,650 for non-members). Vendors successfully completing their registration will receive:

      - An 8’x6’ exhibit space in the Supplier Showcase hall. All you have to do is bring your samples or an iPad that provides your needed visuals, any literature or company information you want to distribute and you’re ready to go — no booth build, no move-in or move-out, and we’ll provide the electrical, furniture and ID sign.
      - Two registrations that allow entry to the SHOT Show itself for the entire duration of the show (additional badges will be offered at a discounted rate).
      - The SmartApp Lead Retrieval program which allows you to instantly capture the contact and demographic information of every manufacturer you interact with during the Showcase.
      - Listing in the 2018 SHOT Show Directory with a special identifying Supplier Showcase logo.
      - Lunch and refreshments on us!
      The 2018 Supplier Showcase will take place Monday, January 22, and the first full day of the show, Tuesday, January 23, so register now — more than 100 vendors signed up during registration opening alone — and make your plans for a busy and profitable week in Las Vegas. More information about the 2018 SHOT Week can be discovered at www.SHOTShow.org, and our Supplier Showcase Marketing Toolkit is also a great resource.

      Note: Sponsorship are now available for the 2018 Supplier Showcase and other SHOT Show events. There are hundreds of sponsorship opportunities, something for every budget, and we can often work on a custom-designed sponsorship package to fit your spending and target marketing plans. For more information, contact Dave Jeannette, NSSF Senior Director, Sales, at djeannette@nssf.org, or Chris Tatulli, NSSF Director, Exhibit & Sponsorship Sales, at ctatulli@nssf.org.

      The post Vendor Registration Opens for 2018 SHOT Show Supplier Showcase appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2017.
      At the 2017 SHOT Show in Las Vegas, we launched our first Supplier Showcase as a way to better connect our manufacturing exhibitors with third-party material and service providers essential to their processes. It was an astounding success, with more than 260 vendors displaying and nearly 3,000 CEOs, procurement specialists, engineers, product designers and others in attendance.

      Feedback from the event from both suppliers and our manufacturing exhibitors was so positive we’re now ... See more
      See more on line
      Vendor Registration Opens for 2018 SHOT Show Supplier Showcase
    • From its humble beginnings in St. Louis, in 1979, to taking every nook and cranny of the Sands Expo Center in 2017, the SHOT Show is the industry’s signature event, bringing together more than 1,700 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees. Next January, SHOT Show will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary, so we asked a handful of today’s top outdoor writers to pick two exhibitors they know well to tell their SHOT Show stories. First up in our new “Blast from the Past” series is Hodgdon Powder and Chris and Bob Hodgdon, interviewed by the very talented Phil Massaro. Enjoy! — Chris Dolnack, NSSF Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer

      Hodgdon Powder Company
      Brothers J.B. (left) and Bob Hodgdon (right), each joined their father, Bruce, to run Hodgdon Powder after graduating from college. Bob is Chris Hodgdon’s father.

      The Hodgdon Powder Company. To a reloader, that name represents an industry staple, a company that has been around for nearly as long as modern reloading itself. Founded just after the Second World War by Bruce Hodgdon, the company is piloted by a third generation Hodgdon, Chris, a man I am lucky enough to call my friend and one of the nicest fellows in the industry.

      Chris is a hard worker, a man devoted to family and Creator, and a man who has seen his fair share of time in the firearms industry. With the 40th SHOT Show in its planning stages as I write these words, I sat down with Chris and his father, Bob Hodgdon, to discuss their views and memories of the SHOT Show — similar and different at the same time — and what it means to them.

      Phil Massaro (PM): Welcome gentleman, and thanks for taking the time to chat about SHOT. I’ve been to four or five SHOT Shows, but I imagine you’ve seen a few more than that. Tell us about your first year.

      Bob Hodgdon (BH): The first SHOT Show in 1979 was a huge event for the owners and management of Hodgdon Powder Company. We, like the rest of the firearms industry community, had been delegated forever to attend the NSGA [National Sporting Goods Association] show in Chicago, the only national trade show available. That venue had always presented lots of obstacles to our industry.

      PM: Bob, how were those older NSGA shows a problem?

      BH: The first was that the management of that show refused to give a segment or integrated area physically to the firearms industry. We were basically scattered throughout other athletic, golf, track, volleyball, tennis exhibits, and what have you … so our customers had to search for us … . Or perhaps just happen to trip upon us as they walked by. We were a small group of exhibitors compared to the full size of that show, and were simply not important enough for any special attention.

      Another huge problem was that the venue had been in the McCormick Place in Chicago, and always in the winter. I can remember transporting our small booth in the company station wagon, unloading at the dock in 40 miles-an-hour winds at just about zero degrees Fahrenheit.

      It was always a very expensive venue, with typical Chicago union workers who took over the second your booth and materials hit the dock, and with many charges and surcharges and extremely high rental fees for every service and needed rented item. I do not remember any special events for any company or our group of vendors, say a press conference, or new products area, or any of the many features that are provided on a routine basis by the NSSF at the Shot Show today.

      PM: Your anticipation must have been high for that first show.

      BH: The first SHOT Show was in St. Louis, probably taking up no more than 30,000 or 40,000 square feet. Many of the firearms companies attended (there were certainly not many in existence then, compared to today), but many did not, as not many could afford both shows, and if you left the NSGA even for a year and then came back, you drew a booth in the back near the restrooms next year.

      I can remember being excited about a place just for our own industry! We built a new booth and cancelled future rentals at the NSGA, which was basically burning your bridges before using them. We gambled on the success of the SHOT Show. Again, we were small, but were excited about the opportunity and were not disappointed, as the traffic first year had to be at least double for our company than at any show previously in Chicago.

      Chris Hodgdon at the Hodgdon Powder Company booth at SHOT Show.

      PM: Chris, your start at SHOT Show came much later than your dad’s. Tell me about it.

      Chris Hodgdon (CH): My first show was in 1995, when the show was held in Dallas. While both my father and uncle tried to explain the sheer scope of it all, their words fell short of what I experienced. I was completely overwhelmed. It was an incredible time — what with all the exhibitors and their goods — and completely gratifying. I immediately noticed how the industry pulled together for this event.

      PM: Chris, I’ve had much the same experience. I liken it to the Mountain Man rendezvous, where we all get to see one another again.

      CH: Exactly. This industry — and my own business especially — is based on friendships and relationships. SHOT is simply the best opportunity to build on old friendships and to create those new relationships with our dealers. While the SHOT Show is filled with tens of thousands of people, our industry is rather small if you think about it, and I consider myself lucky to have so many friends among the attendees.

      PM: What was your best show?

      CH: Probably either 1997, where we launched our VARGET Powder, or 1998, when we launched our Pyrodex Pellets. Both products have been a huge success, and we were very proud to bring them to the show. Likewise, with the acquisition of IMR Powder, Winchester Powder and Goex. All were well received.

      PM: Over the years, Chris, is there one particular product you recall as being the “it” product to have?

      CH: Well, Phil, I’m not a big gadget guy. I have a couple of favorite guns and scopes and whatnot, but I’d put your question in a different light. I think the Obama administration caused our industry to come together in SHOT Show like no other event in my memory. It resulted in a huge, exponential growth in SHOT Show attendance, and our industry banded together in both revolutionary products and hunter/shooter education.

      PM: Did you commit any “rookie mistakes” during your first few shows?

      CH: I am the third-generation Hodgdon to head our company, and you better believe I felt the pressure when the baton was passed to me at SHOT. I did my best, but I knew the target was on my back. In retrospect, it all worked out ok. I’m glad I had the Hodgdon reputation to lean on.

      PM: Chris, tell me one the funnier stories you recall from SHOT Show.

      CH: I have a good one. I was with an advertising rep from a magazine that focuses on traditional muzzleloaders — you know, flintlocks and Hawkens and the like, not the modern in-lines — and he was wondering why we weren’t advertising our Pyrodex powder in their magazine (this was long before we acquired Goex powders). As if on cue, a gentleman decked to the nines in mountain man garb — buckskin fringe jacket and all — walks past the booth, and my buddy Tom asks the guy if he shoots Pyrodex in his flintlock. The guy never broke stride, just bursts out laughing and kept on his way. I looked at the ad rep and said, “There’s your answer.” The rep had no response.

      PM: Chris, give me an idea of how you view the SHOT Show, other than the obvious business dealings.

      CH: Without those dealers, there’s really no point in the show. Other shows — the NRA Annual Meetings come to mind — may be more consumer-based, but the SHOT Show is our opportunity to have great face-to-face conversations with our dealers and distributors and to become friends instead of just over-the-phone business dealings. That’s extremely important to us. We’re a family owned business, and tight relationships are very important to all of us here at Hodgdon. We’re also here to support the NSSF, which is the single-most important industry partner. They’re always here for those of us in the industry, and while there are other groups who focus on individual rights, the NSSF supports us in the business. We’re happy to support them.

      PM: Being self-employed, I understand the stresses involved in running a business. You seem to love what you do at Hodgdon. Every time we talk you’re as excited as if it’s your first day. Tell me about that.

      Chris Hodgdon proudly poses behind a mule deer buck taken with a muzzleloader and Hodgdon powder.

      CH: I really do have that perfect job here at Hodgdon. I’m excited to come to work every day because I get to share my passion of hunting, shooting and reloading with our valued customers — what could be better than that? Following in the footsteps and legacy that my grandfather Bruce, father, Bob, and Uncle J.B. created here at Hodgdon is a great privilege, but all the credit goes to God because he has provided giant blessings for the family business. My coworkers and friends in the industry are incredibly special people, and I’m grateful for every one of them.

      Folks, those are the words from Chris and Bob Hodgdon, two of the many people I look forward to seeing each year at the SHOT Show. Without that opportunity, we may have never had the chance to become good friends. Here’s to SHOT Show’s 40th Anniversary, and 40 more just like it!

      The post SHOT Show 40th Anniversary Blast From the Past: Hodgdon Powder Company appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2017.
      From its humble beginnings in St. Louis, in 1979, to taking every nook and cranny of the Sands Expo Center in 2017, the SHOT Show is the industry’s signature event, bringing together more than 1,700 exhibitors and 65,000 attendees. Next January, SHOT Show will be celebrating its 40th Anniversary, so we asked a handful of today’s top outdoor writers to pick two exhibitors they know well to tell their SHOT Show stories. First up in our new “Blast from the Past” series is Hodgdon Powder ... See more
      See more on line
      SHOT Show 40th Anniversary Blast From the Past: Hodgdon Powder Company
    • Every year about this time we hear from our show management partners at ConvExx that our discounted hotel blocks are selling out. This year is no exception.

      We were just notified that the lowest-priced rooms in the Venetian/Palazzo Resort have sold out. Rooms booked through our block are still heavily discounted from those currently sold on the Venetian/Palazzo website, but rates are increasing. We’ve also been told that several hotels on the Strip are nearing sold-status for the NSSF-negotiated discounted rates. In other words, rooms are still available at all hotels, but the discounted rates are quickly disappearing.

      As has been the case for the past several years, Las Vegas is hosting a number of other trade shows at the same time the 2018 SHOT Show takes place. And while it seems the skyline of Vegas always contains a dozen cranes in the midst of constructing new high-rise hotels, the truth is that the number of available hotel rooms is finite — just ask me how many phone calls we get in December and January from people asking for help because they can’t find a hotel in town.

      I can’t emphasize this enough: If you want easy access to the 2018 SHOT Show via a hotel that’s within walking distance of the Sands Convention Center, or is one of the many connected to the Sands via our SHOT Show shuttle buses or the Las Vegas Monorail, please reserve your hotel room now.

      Click image to go to the SHOT Show hotel reservation page.

      It’s easy. Go to www.SHOTShow.org and hover your mouse over the “Las Vegas” heading at the top of the page, then click the “Hotel and Travel” link in the dropdown menu. The page that pops up displays all the hotels NSSF has worked with to provide blocks of hotel rooms to SHOT Show attendees, including the Venetian/Palazzo, our show headquarters hotels. We have already worked with each of these establishments to provide the best price when you book through our reservation partner onPeak (or through the dedicated link for the VenetiaPalazzo), so there’s no need to haggle with them on your end or spend hours on the phone or online shopping for a deal.

      Remember that bookings listed at www.SHOTShow.org are in real time, which means if we display it, it’s there, and you won’t get a page that says, “Sorry, this rate is sold out, but here’s one that costs $XX more.” And there are rooms literally for every budget, starting with Circus Circus, which still has select rooms available for $29 a night, to the Cosmopolitan, with rooms currently starting at $225 per night. Sure, you can spend more, but that’s totally up to you.

      With the exception of the Venetian/Palazzo, which requires a one-night deposit with your reservation, booking your hotel through our reserved blocks with onPeak will cost you nothing. You can even book your entire staff as one group without a deposit, and if that group or your travel plans shift, there are no change or cancellation fees until closer to show time. Bottom line, you have nothing to lose by booking your hotel room now — and it’ll sure beat calling us in December when you find the only room available is closer to Reno than it is to Vegas.

      The post SHOT Show Hotel Rooms — Yes, They’re Selling Out appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2017.
      Every year about this time we hear from our show management partners at ConvExx that our discounted hotel blocks are selling out. This year is no exception.

      We were just notified that the lowest-priced rooms in the Venetian/Palazzo Resort have sold out. Rooms booked through our block are still heavily discounted from those currently sold on the Venetian/Palazzo website, but rates are increasing. We’ve also been told that several hotels on the Strip are nearing sold-status for the ... See more
      See more on line
      SHOT Show Hotel Rooms — Yes, They’re Selling Out