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NSCA - NSSA

Leagues and Federations

San Antonio - US National Sporting Clays and Skeet Shooting Association

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    • Ask the Instructor: Chokes for Beginners
      One of the more perplexing aspects of shotgunning is the use of chokes. One beginner asks for insight and clarification into proper choke usage:
      "I am a beginner at sporting clays and love the sport. I’m hooked — but I am so incredibly confused about chokes! What should I use and when?" Read NSCA Chief Instructor Don Currie's advice:http://nssa-nsca.org/blog/2017/09/07/ask-the-instructor-chokes-for-beginners/
      Ask the Instructor: Chokes for Beginners
      One of the more perplexing aspects of shotgunning is the use of chokes. One beginner asks for insight and clarification into proper choke usage:
      "I am a beginner at sporting clays and love the sport. I’m hooked — but I am so incredibly confused about chokes! What should I use and when?" Read NSCA Chief Instructor Don Currie's advice: ... See more
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    • Apply to Serve on NSCA Advisory Council!

      There are still spots in the NSCA Advisory Council that need to be filled! The application period closes this Friday, September 22, for those who wish to serve the National Sporting Clays Association in the position of Advisory Council Member for the 2018-2019 term. Learn more here: http://mailchi.mp/60b6f80a1702/apply-to-serve-on-nsca-advisory-council-142609?e=8e1bb844c8
      Apply to Serve on NSCA Advisory Council!

      There are still spots in the NSCA Advisory Council that need to be filled! The application period closes this Friday, September 22, for those who wish to serve the National Sporting Clays Association in the position of Advisory Council Member for the 2018-2019 term. Learn more here: ... See more
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    • Join us Monday, October 26, during Nationals as we honor three individuals who will be inducted into the NSSA Hall of Fame. This year's inductees for Shooting Achievement is Bonnie I. McLaurin and Mark R. "Boo" Dykes, and recipient of the Hal du Post Service Award will be Pete Masch. Reserved tickets must be purchased by October 23, 2017. More information and reservations: http://nsca.nssa-nsca.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2017/07/NSCA-HOF-Ticket-Form.pdf
      Join us Monday, October 26, during Nationals as we honor three individuals who will be inducted into the NSSA Hall of Fame. This year's inductees for Shooting Achievement is Bonnie I. McLaurin and Mark R. "Boo" Dykes, and recipient of the Hal du Post Service Award will be Pete Masch. Reserved tickets must be purchased by October 23, 2017. More information and reservations: ... See more
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    • Ladies are invited to get away from the National Shooting Complex for a day during Nationals to join us for a Hill Country Wine Tour and visit to the lovely, historic town of Gruene, Texas. On October 27, we'll leave the NSC on a motor coach at 8:30 a.m. and return at 4:30 p.m. Cost is $45 per person. Get the details and reservation info: http://nsca.nssa-nsca.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/7/2017/08/NSCA-Ladies-Tour-2017_web.jpg
      Ladies are invited to get away from the National Shooting Complex for a day during Nationals to join us for a Hill Country Wine Tour and visit to the lovely, historic town of Gruene, Texas. On October 27, we'll leave the NSC on a motor coach at 8:30 a.m. and return at 4:30 p.m. Cost is $45 per person. Get the details and reservation info: ... See more
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    • Driven birds can be challenging to hit. They require that shot execution be decisive, with no hesitation once the target is covered with the barrel.
      "I live in England and I am primarily a driven bird shooter. Traditional shotgunning techniques don’t seem to work with this target. I’ve read Churchill and Stanbury but I have never seen the 40- to 60-yard driven bird addressed in a video. Any advice?" Read NSCA Chief Instructor Don Currie's advice: http://nssa-nsca.org/blog/2017/08/16/ask-the-instructor-driven-birds/
      Driven birds can be challenging to hit. They require that shot execution be decisive, with no hesitation once the target is covered with the barrel.
      "I live in England and I am primarily a driven bird shooter. Traditional shotgunning techniques don’t seem to work with this target. I’ve read Churchill and Stanbury but I have never seen the 40- to 60-yard driven bird addressed in a video. Any advice?" Read NSCA Chief Instructor Don Currie's advice: See more
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    • More than 1400 members have already signed up to compete in the 2017 National Sporting Clays Championship and to claim their share of more than $300,000 in guns and other prizes to be given away. If you've never participated in the National Championship, make this your year! Any member can attend, and everyone competes against others in their own class. The event is October 21-29 at the National Shooting Complex in San Antonio. Learn more and register: http://nsca.nssa-nsca.org/national-championship/
      More than 1400 members have already signed up to compete in the 2017 National Sporting Clays Championship and to claim their share of more than $300,000 in guns and other prizes to be given away. If you've never participated in the National Championship, make this your year! Any member can attend, and everyone competes against others in their own class. The event is October 21-29 at the National Shooting Complex in San Antonio. Learn more and register: See more
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    • Join us on Thursday, October 26 during the National Sporting Clays Championship as we honor three individuals with induction into the NSCA Hall of Fame. Inducted for their accomplishments as shooters will be Bonnie McLaurin and Mark "Boo" Dykes. The recipient of the Hal du Pont Service Award will be Pete Masch. Reservations are now being taken for banquet tickets. MORE: http://nsca.nssa-nsca.org/2017/07/21/nsca-hall-of-fame-inductees/
      Join us on Thursday, October 26 during the National Sporting Clays Championship as we honor three individuals with induction into the NSCA Hall of Fame. Inducted for their accomplishments as shooters will be Bonnie McLaurin and Mark "Boo" Dykes. The recipient of the Hal du Pont Service Award will be Pete Masch. Reservations are now being taken for banquet tickets. MORE: ... See more
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    • Ask the Instructor: Practice Rounds
      Practice makes perfect, right? Not necessarily; it requires focus, planning and striving toward specific goals.
      "Do you believe shooting a round of 50 or 100 is the best type of training there is to increase your scores in sporting clays, or do you believe there are other routes to achieve percentage growth in this game?" Read NSCA Chief Instructor Don Currie's advice: http://nssa-nsca.org/blog/2017/07/24/ask-the-instructor-practice-rounds/
      Ask the Instructor: Practice Rounds
      Practice makes perfect, right? Not necessarily; it requires focus, planning and striving toward specific goals.
      "Do you believe shooting a round of 50 or 100 is the best type of training there is to increase your scores in sporting clays, or do you believe there are other routes to achieve percentage growth in this game?" Read NSCA Chief Instructor Don Currie's advice: ... See more
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    • Nominations are now closed for 2018-2019 National Delegates, and ballots are being prepared to email to members on August 1 for online voting. Any members who require a paper ballot can request one by contacting Glynne Moseley, gmoseley@nssa-nsca.com or 210-688-3371 ext. 119. If you don't have an email address on file or to update yours for an online ballot, click here: http://nsca.nssa-nsca.org/member-change-of-address/
      Nominations are now closed for 2018-2019 National Delegates, and ballots are being prepared to email to members on August 1 for online voting. Any members who require a paper ballot can request one by contacting Glynne Moseley, gmoseley@nssa-nsca.com or 210-688-3371 ext. 119. If you don't have an email address on file or to update yours for an online ballot, click here: ... See more
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    • The North Carolina and NSSA skeet shooting community lost a great competitor and friend on March 21. Harold Powell from Goldsboro, North Carolina, passed away at the age of 82. Harold was a member of Seymour Johnson A.F.B. Gun Club for over 50 years and Ft. Bragg Gun Club for over 15 years.

      Harold began shooting skeet in the early 1960s and went on to achieve many accomplishments as a strong and well-respected competitor. He was a 27-time All-American Team member. Harold attended 24 World Skeet Shoots, 26 Zone 4 Shoots and won many Texas and North Carolina Championships to include Texas State first team from 1984-1997. In 1997, after 40 years of government service as an Air Force Technical Engineer on the B-1 Bomber, Harold retired and returned to his home in North Carolina, continuing to shoot and win many North Carolina State and local championships. Harold also won the Krieghoff Masters .410 gun championship in 2005 as one of his many highlighted accomplishments to include his standing 1987 2-Man Team Sub-Senior world record score in the .410 with his teammate Jack Johnson with a 197×200. Harold was inducted into the North Carolina State Hall of Fame in 2010 for his many career championships that spanned over 40 years and his 248,949 lifetime targets shot.

      Stuart Brown remembers Harold Powell as one of the smartest, kindest, humble and most generous men he’s ever known. “His strong conservative values, larger-than-life personality, dedication to his family and friends, and his love for shooting skeet were the foundation of the respect I have for him,” said Brown. “He taught and shared with me so many things I don’t have enough space to write about them all. I am a better man in many ways on the skeet field and, more importantly, off the skeet field with life’s challenges because of his influence in my life. I know that God now has strong addition to his leadership team in heaven. I will miss Harold, my friend.”

      Harold was known as a fine gentleman of our sport and true ambassador of skeet throughout his years of competing. He loved his wife Doris and his family who proudly supported him throughout his shooting career. NSSA extends its sympathies to Harold’s friends and family.
      The North Carolina and NSSA skeet shooting community lost a great competitor and friend on March 21. Harold Powell from Goldsboro, North Carolina, passed away at the age of 82. Harold was a member of Seymour Johnson A.F.B. Gun Club for over 50 years and Ft. Bragg Gun Club for over 15 years.

      Harold began shooting skeet in the early 1960s and went on to achieve many accomplishments as a strong and well-respected competitor. He was a 27-time All-American Team member. Harold attended 24 ... See more
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      NSSA Member Harold Powell Passes
    • Carl Malinosky, Jr., longtime resident of Milford, Connecticut, passed away on April 12 at the age of 82. Carl was married to his wife, Patricia Malinosky, for 56 years before her passing in 2013.

      Carl was an avid skeet shooter and traveled to tournaments with his wife and son throughout the Northeast, East Coast and the South. He was a member of Seymour Fish and Game and Ansonia Fish and Game clubs. Carl was a member of the National Skeet Shooting Association since 1960, shot a total of 170,600 registered targets and attended 18 World Shoots. His many distinguished skeet shooting accomplishments include, along with his wife Pat, becoming the first couple to break 100 straight targets (2 x 100) in the .410 bore (1975) and being elected to the Connecticut Skeet Shooting Hall of Fame in 1988.

      Carl was also active behind the scenes. He served as treasurer of the Connecticut Skeet Shooting Association for 12 years and as a National Director representing Connecticut for 24 years.

      Besides shooting, Carl had many interests which included coaching boys’ basketball, dirt bike riding, hunting, fishing, golf and bowling. He served with the U.S. Army (1954-56) in the Panama Canal Zone during the Korean War. For most of his career, Carl worked as a machinist for Remington Arms in Bridgeport, Connecticut and then as a consultant when Remington relocated to Arkansas.

      Carl was a social individual whose strong will and determination fostered his enjoyment of competitive activities.

      Carl is survived by his son Carl Malinosky, III (and his wife Sharon) and extended family members.
      Carl Malinosky, Jr., longtime resident of Milford, Connecticut, passed away on April 12 at the age of 82. Carl was married to his wife, Patricia Malinosky, for 56 years before her passing in 2013.

      Carl was an avid skeet shooter and traveled to tournaments with his wife and son throughout the Northeast, East Coast and the South. He was a member of Seymour Fish and Game and Ansonia Fish and Game clubs. Carl was a member of the National Skeet Shooting Association since 1960, shot a total ... See more
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      Skeet Enthusiast Carl Malinosky, Jr. Passes
    • The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) applauds the work of responsible firearm owners for helping to keep guns out of the wrong hands, as it shares the latest data regarding unintentional fatalities involving firearms. The National Safety Council’s “Injury Facts-2017 Edition” shows a 17 percent decrease in accidents involving firearms from 2014 to 2015, a year in which firearms sales soared.

      This decline to 489 unintentional firearms-related fatalities is the lowest total since record-keeping began in 1903 and accounts for less than 1 percent (three-tenths of 1 percent) of the 146,571 accident deaths from all listed causes, which were up 8 percent from 2014 to 2015. This decrease, which was the largest percentage decline of any category, came in a year that saw record high firearms sales to many millions of Americans.

      “This latest release from the National Safety Council shows that the vast majority of the 100 million American firearms owners meet the serious responsibilities which come with firearms ownership,” said NSSF President and CEO Steve Sanetti. “They store their firearms safely and securely when not in use, and follow the basic rules of firearms safety when handling them.”

      “The many firearms safety educational programs sponsored by the firearms industry and firearms safety instructors nationwide, such as the NSSF’s Project ChildSafe, are also part of the reason for this ever-downward trend in firearms accidents,” Sanetti added. “We will continue to work with organizations interested in genuine firearms safety to help reduce the number of firearms accidents even further in the days and years ahead.”
      The National Shooting Sports Foundation (NSSF) applauds the work of responsible firearm owners for helping to keep guns out of the wrong hands, as it shares the latest data regarding unintentional fatalities involving firearms. The National Safety Council’s “Injury Facts-2017 Edition” shows a 17 percent decrease in accidents involving firearms from 2014 to 2015, a year in which firearms sales soared.

      This decline to 489 unintentional firearms-related fatalities is the lowest ... See more
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      National Safety Council: Firearms Accidental Deaths at Lowest Level
    • This year’s USA Sporting Clays Team Super Schools are getting rave reviews from participants, and for those who haven’t yet participated in one, there are two opportunities. The USASCT will offer two Super Schools immediately following the World English Sporting Championship on May 1-2 at the National Shooting Complex — one that is open to everyone and another that is for ladies only.

      The Super Schools provide 8 hours of instruction each day, all targets, and breakfast and lunch each day.

      USA Sporting Clays Team members Kevin De Michiel, Zachary Kienbaum, and David Radulovich will instruct at the school open to everyone. Cost of that school is $2000 per person. Desirae Edmunds and Diane Sorantino will teach the ladies-only school, and the fee is $1500 per person.

      For more information or to reserve your spot at one of these upcoming schools, contact Brett Moyes, bmoyes@nssa-nsca.com. Space is very limited, so don’t delay!
      This year’s USA Sporting Clays Team Super Schools are getting rave reviews from participants, and for those who haven’t yet participated in one, there are two opportunities. The USASCT will offer two Super Schools immediately following the World English Sporting Championship on May 1-2 at the National Shooting Complex — one that is open to everyone and another that is for ladies only.

      The Super Schools provide 8 hours of instruction each day, all targets, and breakfast and lunch ... See more
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      USASCT Offering Super Schools Following World English
    • The National Shooting Complex is expanding its shooting cart storage capacity with the construction of a new enclosed storage barn. Construction is expected to begin soon.

      Reserved spots will be available. The units will be 10 feet wide by 16 feet deep with an 8-foot, lockable roll-up door. Floors will be concrete, and each unit will have lights on an independent switch and a 4-gang electric outlet.

      Fee options are $5000 paid in full for a five-year lease or $1200 paid in full for a one-year lease.

      The current open covered storage will also have some openings upon completion of the new barn. The fee for open covered storage is $480, paid in full for a one-year lease.

      To reserve a space or request more information, contact Olivia Gracia at nscrv@nssa-nsca.com or 210-688-3371 ext. 138.
      The National Shooting Complex is expanding its shooting cart storage capacity with the construction of a new enclosed storage barn. Construction is expected to begin soon.

      Reserved spots will be available. The units will be 10 feet wide by 16 feet deep with an 8-foot, lockable roll-up door. Floors will be concrete, and each unit will have lights on an independent switch and a 4-gang electric outlet.

      Fee options are $5000 paid in full for a five-year lease or $1200 paid in full ... See more
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      New NSC Shooting Cart Storage Coming Soon
    • Photo by Tim Le CrasNSSA wants you to host a youth skeet camp at your member club, and we’re offering cash to help offset the cost of targets and ammunition. NSSA will provide $1000 to member clubs for expenses, as well as assistance in planning and possibly the services of our Chief Instructor.

      Most camps are held in June and July while youth are out of school for the summer. To take advantage of the financial assistance, there must be a minimum of 10 youth, ages 12-18, but 20 or more are preferred. Ages depend on the maturity and size of youth. Instruction at the camps should be aimed at beginning and intermediate level students.

      Clubs need to provide a field for each five students, i.e., 20 campers need four fields.

      Youth will shoot approximately 22 rounds of skeet during a three-day camp. (Two-day camps are also an option.) Cost to the participants is usually $150 to $200, determined by the cost for targets, shells and anything else that’s included, such as breakfast, lunch and refreshments.

      When his schedule allows, Chief Instructor Ralph Aaron will conduct the camp for your club at no charge. Other local certified instructors may also be available. One instructor is needed per five students. Depending on your location, the instructor program may be able to furnish four youth model Remington 11-87s for the camp.

      If you are interested in hosting a youth skeet camp to introduce new shooters to our sport and to help grow our organization, contact Ralph Aaron at rpaskeet@yahoo.com.
      Photo by Tim Le CrasNSSA wants you to host a youth skeet camp at your member club, and we’re offering cash to help offset the cost of targets and ammunition. NSSA will provide $1000 to member clubs for expenses, as well as assistance in planning and possibly the services of our Chief Instructor.

      Most camps are held in June and July while youth are out of school for the summer. To take advantage of the financial assistance, there must be a minimum of 10 youth, ages 12-18, but 20 or ... See more
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      Host an NSSA Youth Skeet Camp at Your Club
    • Head Lifting

      What is the secret to keeping one’s head on the stock? When I raise my head, I miss. I can’t seem to stop it, and it’s very frustrating.

      Shooters who have trouble with head lifting usually premount or mount to the shoulder first instead of mounting to the cheek first. The first and best thing you can do to prevent head lifting is to mount to the cheek first, instead of the shoulder. If a shooter properly mounts to the cheek first and maintains the weight of the gun in the hands throughout execution of the target pair, it is virtually impossible to lift the head. If you premount your gun to the shoulder or shift the weight of the gun to the shoulder after you mount, you will have a greater tendency to lift your head from the stock during shot execution.

      There are typically three reasons you would tend to subconsciously lift your head from the stock after shifting the weight of the gun into the shoulder:

      1) Gun fit. If the drop at comb is too excessive (the height of the comb is too low), the lifting of the head is a subconscious effort to see the target as it disappears behind the barrel and receiver.

      2) Gun mount. Assuming that your shotgun fits you properly, you might be “digging in” to the stock with your head as you mount. Once again, this can cause the target to be occluded (blocked) by the shotgun, and you will tend to lift your head subconsciously in an effort to see the target.

      3) Ejecting from the gun prematurely. Occasionally, I will work with a shooter who is dismounting the shotgun very quickly after executing the shot, perhaps even before the shot is complete. This is usually caused by a failure to maintain acute visual focus on the target as it breaks. So, make sure your gun fits, keep the head still and oriented on the target (don’t dig in) and follow through with your eyes (watch impact).

      Don Currie is NSCA’s Chief Instructor, an Orvis Wingshooting School instructor, and Master Class competitor. To get free shooting tips and videos, sign up for his monthly newsletter. You can also see more tips from Currie at www.doncurrie.com.
      Head Lifting

      What is the secret to keeping one’s head on the stock? When I raise my head, I miss. I can’t seem to stop it, and it’s very frustrating.

      Shooters who have trouble with head lifting usually premount or mount to the shoulder first instead of mounting to the cheek first. The first and best thing you can do to prevent head lifting is to mount to the cheek first, instead of the shoulder. If a shooter properly mounts to the cheek first and maintains the ... See more
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      Ask the Instructor: Head Lifting
    • Dirty Choke Tubes

      I get a significant amount of plastic residue on the inside of my screw-in choke tubes after a couple of hundred targets. Is there a technique you might recommend to clean the chokes?

      Everyone seems to have his or her favorite chokes and cleaner. For traditional metal/aluminum chokes, I find that soaking them in Slip 2000 for at least 20 minutes and later running a wire brush through them is the most efficient way to clean them. While I have not personally tried them (but have many students and friends that use them), Muller Chokes seem to be a cleaner-performing choke than traditional metal/aluminum chokes. Muller chokes are coated with a proprietary ceramic material similar to Teflon that resists plastic residue or carbon buildup. Muller’s website states, “The proprietary ceramic is blended with a material similar to a non-stick frying pan, only harder, to give an extremely high lubricity factor that will not allow plastic wad or carbon to adhere.”

      Plastic residue often builds in the area of the forcing cones as well. The forcing cone is a transitional area of the barrel just past the chamber where the barrel narrows from the width of the chamber to the nominal width of the barrel. This is an area of increased friction between the wad and the interior wall of the barrel and will naturally often collect excess plastic residue from the wad. Whether you’re cleaning residue from the inside of choke tubes or the inside of the shotgun barrel, the best option will be a solvent in combination with a wire brush.

      Don Currie is NSCA’s Chief Instructor, an Orvis Wingshooting School instructor, and Master Class competitor. To get free shooting tips and videos, sign up for his monthly newsletter. You can also see more tips from Currie at www.doncurrie.com.
      Dirty Choke Tubes

      I get a significant amount of plastic residue on the inside of my screw-in choke tubes after a couple of hundred targets. Is there a technique you might recommend to clean the chokes?

      Everyone seems to have his or her favorite chokes and cleaner. For traditional metal/aluminum chokes, I find that soaking them in Slip 2000 for at least 20 minutes and later running a wire brush through them is the most efficient way to clean them. While I have not ... See more
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      Ask the Instructor: Dirty Choke Tubes
    • Lens Tint

      What tint lenses will provide greatest depth perception? My understanding is that dilated pupils will give the most depth perception as more light enters.

      The more light that flows to the eye, without causing eyestrain, the greater your depth of field and your ability to perceive detail, color and contrast. It all comes down: to rods and cones, the two different types of receptors in the eye. Cones are resident in the center back portion of the eye (the fovea) and aid in perception of detail and color. This is the part of the eye that receives the critical detailed information about a target when you apply acute visual focus to it at the break point. Rods, on the other hand, play an important role in peripheral vision. The rods are resident in the area of the eye that surrounds the center of the eye. Our peripheral vision is excellent at initially detecting the motion of the target as it emerges from the trap but is not as good at detecting color and contrast. In low light conditions, when the pupil dilates (gets bigger), more light is pushed to the ambient system (the rods), reducing our depth of field and our ability to perceive color, detail and contrast. In brighter conditions, the pupils constrict, allowing more light into the center of our visual field (the fovea), where depth perception, contrast, color and detail are best perceived.

      What conclusions can we draw from all of this?

      1) It is best to leverage your peripheral vision when initially acquiring targets. Rather than putting your eyes directly on the arm of the trap, allow your peripheral vision to initially acquire targets and apply acute focus through the break point.

      2) When selecting the density of your lens tint (brighter or darker), use the lightest lens possible without causing eyestrain.

      3) Use lenses with high-quality UV and anti-reflective coatings. Lens coatings, such as those used on Pilla Vivex Lenses, filter out harmful and distracting wavelengths of light, allowing you to wear a lighter lens without eyestrain.

      Don Currie is NSCA’s Chief Instructor, an Orvis Wingshooting School instructor, and Master Class competitor. To get free shooting tips and videos, sign up for his monthly newsletter. You can also see more tips from Currie at www.doncurrie.com.
      Lens Tint

      What tint lenses will provide greatest depth perception? My understanding is that dilated pupils will give the most depth perception as more light enters.

      The more light that flows to the eye, without causing eyestrain, the greater your depth of field and your ability to perceive detail, color and contrast. It all comes down: to rods and cones, the two different types of receptors in the eye. Cones are resident in the center back portion of the eye (the fovea) ... See more
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      Ask the Instructor: Lens Tint
    • Hold Point

      I’ve always been told to keep my eyes centered in my head to follow the bird (ocular center) and turn my head toward the visual hold point. I see in your video that you say to cut your eyes back to the visual hold point, and if needed, turn your head slightly. Can you clarify?

      Proper shot execution requires acute visual focus and a head and muzzle that are synchronized with the target through the break point. Movement to a target must include an acute visual “fix” on the target together with a brief period, prior to shot execution, when the head is quiet and synchronized relative to the target. There is plenty of science behind this statement, chief among them being Joan Vickers’ text “Perception Cognition -The Quiet Eye in Action”. In this text, Vickers chronicles how the eyes of elite athletes operate during sports activities in which they must “intercept” a moving object. A summary can be found on my website at this link: bit.ly/QuietEye.

      So, what does this mean for the clay target shooter? If possible, use only the eye muscles to move the eyes to the visual pick-up point. Your peripheral vision is exponentially more effective at initially acquiring targets than your direct vision. Turn the head only to the extent necessary to settle your eyes on your chosen visual pick-up point. If you have to move the head to position the eyes on the visual pickup point, keep your head as synchronized as possible with the body and target throughout the move and execution of the shot. One of the most destructive errors I see committed by shooters is a move of the head down to the gun at the end of the “stroke.” This upsets and interrupts the flow of high-definition information about the target to the brain. Acute focus, a quiet head and a quiet muzzle will “feed the brain” the high-definition imagery it needs to break the target. I always say, “If the camera is quiet, the brain is seeing a clear image.” Minimize the move of the head. If the head and gun are synchronized with the target at the break point, the quality of the image will be sufficient to break the target.

      Don Currie is NSCA’s Chief Instructor, an Orvis Wingshooting School instructor, and Master Class competitor. To get free shooting tips and videos, sign up for his monthly newsletter. You can also see more tips from Currie at www.doncurrie.com.
      Hold Point

      I’ve always been told to keep my eyes centered in my head to follow the bird (ocular center) and turn my head toward the visual hold point. I see in your video that you say to cut your eyes back to the visual hold point, and if needed, turn your head slightly. Can you clarify?

      Proper shot execution requires acute visual focus and a head and muzzle that are synchronized with the target through the break point. Movement to a target must include an acute ... See more
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      Ask the Instructor: Hold Point