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    • Welcome to NSSF’s SHOT Show column, “Working the Show.” Designed to help retailers and range owners of all sizes realize the most from their time and money spent in Las Vegas every year at SHOT Show, “Working the Show” examines how these retailers, along with manufacturers and media members, are maintaining contacts, responding to trends, changing their marketing based on their purchases and other follow-up tactics. Of course, a critical part of every plan while visiting SHOT Show should be to stop by the NSSF booth and learn more about your benefits and meet the NSSF team. We look forward to your visit!

      —John McNamara, NSSF Senior Director, Retailer Services

      Shedhorn moves old inventory online to make way for new.
      Shedhorn Sports in Ennis, Montana, was founded by Rob Gallentine in 1979. The business began as just a small department within a Gambles Hardware store 50 miles from Bozeman where Rob and his dad, Glen, operated a family outfitting business offering high-country summer pack trips and guided big-game hunts. At the time, southwest Montana didn't have a sporting goods store available that catered to hunters in the area, so a niche was identified and the rest, as they say, is history. Today, the hardware store is no more, but the family tradition of Shedhorn Sports continues as one of the most respected sporting goods retailers in Montana.

      Similar to other outdoor retailers, Shedhorn offers guns, ammunition, hunting equipment, archery gear and adventure clothing. Its downtown location is within walking distance of the famous Madison River, making Shedhorn’s fishing tackle business brisk, as well.

      Gallentine’s mission is to see customers enjoy the outdoors by offering high-quality products at competitive prices. Gallentine begins formulating his buying strategy for the year immediately following SHOT Show but admits he does “sit on his heels a little bit,” taking in other shows before putting his plan in place at his buyer’s show.

      “The SHOT Show is kind of a predecessor for me to Sports, Inc.’s buying group,” explains Gallentine about the brief lag time between SHOT Show and when he does most of his actual buying. “With SHOT Show, I kind of come home and I say ‘All right, if I’ve gotta buy something, I’m going to do it through the buying group — unless it is something different like [something new from] Freedom Arms. After SHOT, I came back and ordered three more Freedom Arms handguns to come in this year. We just got done with a Sports Inc. show in Phoenix, where we spent $700,000 to $800,000 with several manufacturers.”

      When it comes to trying to directly monetize SHOT Show, Gallentine calls it “a wash,” noting that, unfortunately, a lot of manufacturers don’t yet have price lists available. As such, SHOT doesn’t directly affect his buying much, though he says he enjoys Vegas and that it’s important for him to be there to see exclusives from big brands such as Browning and Winchester. “With Les Baer and Ed Brown, you’re not going to see them anywhere else in the world,” he concedes. After SHOT, Gallentine places his dealer-direct orders within the month.

      Using social media during the show to talk about new products, followed by repeat mentions after the show and “New at Shedhorn” announcements keep the foot traffic brisk and the register ringing.

      During and after SHOT, Shedhorn keeps customers informed about new items and product lines through social media and its website. Gallentine calls his Facebook marketing plan “viable” and notes that they’re always trying to do better at it. Radio and TV “do well,” according to him, but for Shedhorn, print advertising just doesn’t work.

      “We picked up Proof Research,” Gallentine says of an example of a new product line he added at this year’s SHOT Show. “Met them at SHOT Show and I went through the items with the guys there and decided ‘Yes, I’m going to bring in Proof Research.’ It’s a Montana company and they’re supposed to be the best carbon-fiber barrels out there, so it’s on Facebook now along with a couple other new lines.”

      Gallentine says they post about new products both during the show and throughout the year. “It’s good that everybody who sees Shedhorn Sports online [at SHOT Show] knows that we're looking for new products,” Gallentine says of their social media posts. After SHOT is over, he posts those new products on both Facebook and his website when they actually come into the store and promotes those items as “New at Shedhorn.” “Every gun in the store is on our website organized by manufacturer. Anybody cruising my inventory will see it,” he adds.

      Instead of waiting until the last minute and blowing out inventory in a rush (and often at a loss) as many retailers do, Shedhorn works diligently throughout the early winter months before SHOT Show to move its older inventory.

      With lots of new products coming in, Gallentine works to eliminate old inventory during November and December, rather than try and blow it out at the last minute. “Moving old inventory by discounting it or whatever just doesn’t work very well for me,” he says.

      That is unless it’s optics. “Scope lines are different,” Gallentine explains, saying how optics makers constantly make tweaks, leaving him with “old” optics on the shelf that in-store customers don’t want because they expect to see only the newest products. “We use eBay for that,” Gallentine says of how he moves out last year’s optics. “We try to get rid of them on eBay so that when a customer comes in the store looking for a bino, he doesn’t buy the discontinued one that you don’t make any profit on. He buys the new model that you actually make a few hundred dollars on.”

      Though 2018 may ultimately end up being a challenging year for retailers, Gallentine came back from SHOT a little bit more enthusiastic about the coming year. “I was a little bit more aggressive in my buying after I got done there,” he says. “I think it’s going to be a good year. I came away really excited about this coming year.”

      See how Shedhorn’s dedication to both its die-hard hunting clientele and its staff makes it a destination retailer in this “From the Counter” column by Peter Mathiessen.

      About the Author
      Warren Berg is a 25-year veteran of the shooting, hunting and outdoors industry. He has penned hundreds of articles under many names for such storied publications as American Rifleman and Field & Stream. He has produced award-winning television programs on personal-defense and has hunted extensively in North America, Europe 
      and Africa.

      The post Working the Show: Shedhorn Sports, Ennis, Montana appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      Welcome to NSSF’s SHOT Show column, “Working the Show.” Designed to help retailers and range owners of all sizes realize the most from their time and money spent in Las Vegas every year at SHOT Show, “Working the Show” examines how these retailers, along with manufacturers and media members, are maintaining contacts, responding to trends, changing their marketing based on their purchases and other follow-up tactics. Of course, a critical part of every plan while visiting SHOT Show ... See more
      See more on line
      Working the Show: Shedhorn Sports, Ennis, Montana
    • Welcome to NSSF’s SHOT Show column, “Working the Show.” Designed to help retailers and range owners of all sizes realize the most from their time and money spent in Las Vegas every year at SHOT Show, “Working the Show” examines how these retailers, along with manufacturers and media members, are maintaining contacts, responding to trends, changing their marketing based on their purchases and other follow-up tactics. Of course, a critical part of every plan while visiting SHOT Show should be to stop by the NSSF booth and learn more about your benefits and meet the NSSF team. We look forward to your visit!

      —John McNamara, NSSF Senior Director, Retailer Services

      Facility Background
      Centennial Gun Club’s Richard Abramson is a recipient of the SHOT Business Award for Independent Retailer of the Year.

      Centennial Gun Club is a membership-based firearms store, shooting range and training facility located in the suburb of Centennial, Colorado, south of Denver. Since 2012, this facility has offered a complete “Equip-Prepare-Practice” experience that combines an exceptional firearms dealer with a state-of-the-art firing range and outstanding firearms training.

      “We believe that having the right equipment, receiving outstanding training and practicing on the range on a regular basis are the keys to skills-at-arms,” says Centennial’s CEO and General Manager, Richard Abramson. “Centennial Gun Club brings all these elements together in one location. Our training programs help us to segment customers as we ask them to select a training track that meets their interests: safety, marksmanship, competition, personal defense, etc. We market products and services to them based on these interests.”

      Though membership-based and boasting about 5,600 members, the facility is also open to the public. It is staffed by 52 employees Monday through Friday 9:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Saturdays 8:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. and Sundays 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. The nearly 5,000-square-foot retail space is stocked with approximately 1,500 new and 300 used handguns, shotguns and rifles (primarily MSRs) for target shooting and defensive use, as well as their complementary accessories. The shooting facility maintains 44 lanes, there are four training classrooms and four on-staff gunsmiths.

      SHOT Show’s Information Propels the Year
      Each year at SHOT Show, the Centennial team attends SHOT Show University. In the last two years staff has also attended the new Executive Management Seminar. Of both, Abramson says they glean useful information that they implement immediately after the show.

      “Information on products is shared with our staff upon return from SHOT Show,” he explains, adding that if they see interesting new products at SHOT, they will take photos or video for later posting on their social media sites, provided the products will be available in the store in the near future.

      Centennial does not necessarily place a lot of orders at SHOT Show, but Abramson says they will take advantage of show specials that give them the best opportunities to boost margins or bring interesting new products to their store.

      “In addition to the retail products, we spend time with the range equipment manufacturers to find new innovation that will bring more shooters into our range. This includes new types of target systems that make the shooting experience more fun and bring additional revenue to our business. We also look for new training tools to use in our instruction,” he says.

      At SHOT, Abramson asks manufacturers to provide looping video that can be used on Centennial’s digital in-store signage, social media, e-blasts and website.

      “When new items arrive at the store, we take a photo or video and post it on social media with a product introduction,” says Abramson, adding that they move out old inventory post-show by marking down prices.

      An annual Firearms Festival attracts approximately 5,000 customers who enjoy everything from live music to meeting special guests.

      Another one of Abramson’s objectives at SHOT is to get commitments for vendor weekends and support for Centennial’s large annual community event, their Firearms Festival. The festival attracts nearly 5,000 guests who enjoy everything from live entertainment and prizes, games, food trucks, vendors, sales, pro shooter appearances and swag to meeting special guests such as two of the heroes of Benghazi, John “Tig” Tiegen and Mark “Oz” Geist.

      Post-Show Marketing That Works
      For the majority of its marketing communications after SHOT Show is over and new product intros have been decided on for the year, Centennial relies on email, Instagram and Facebook, though the gun club created a unique closed group within Facebook to communicate more freely with its customers. To join the closed group, Facebook users must request permission to join and be accepted.

      “Facebook is so discriminatory against the firearms industry, about the only way you can get a message out on Facebook is by the group,” Abramson explains about why they created the group. Though there is organic growth to the group, Abramson says Centennial Gun Club pushes joining its range membership through email messages and in-store displays. “It’s getting close to 5,000 users right now,” he says of the Facebook closed group.

      “We’re an active membership-based organization,” he added, “so I think we probably have a bit more of a personal relationship with our customers than those ranges that aren’t membership-based,” Abramson says, also explaining how Centennial uses everything from in-store suggestion boxes to email feedback as listening posts for what customers want.

      Centennial’s training programs help segment customers by having them select a training track that meets their interests. The ability to meet those interests is driven in large part by the range equipment manufacturers Centennial’s staff meets with at SHOT Show.

      One of its regular social media campaigns is Centennial’s clever “Gun of the Month” program in which a specific model is offered at special pricing or packaged with various accessories, a rental model is free that month and there is a drawing for a free firearm.

      “We do contests and drawings through our social media and use Infusionsoft to create sales funnels,” says Abramson. “We pick up all of our drawing entries through a text campaign, so we pick up a lot of new folks’ contact info just from them entering the drawing. It’s just a really successful program for us.”

      About the Author
      Warren Berg is a 25-year veteran of the shooting, hunting and outdoors industry. He has penned hundreds of articles under many names for such storied publications as American Rifleman and Field & Stream. He has produced award-winning television programs on personal-defense and has hunted extensively in North America, Europe and Africa.

      The post Working the Show: Centennial Gun Club, Centennial, Colorado appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      Welcome to NSSF’s SHOT Show column, “Working the Show.” Designed to help retailers and range owners of all sizes realize the most from their time and money spent in Las Vegas every year at SHOT Show, “Working the Show” examines how these retailers, along with manufacturers and media members, are maintaining contacts, responding to trends, changing their marketing based on their purchases and other follow-up tactics. Of course, a critical part of every plan while visiting SHOT Show ... See more
      See more on line
      Working the Show: Centennial Gun Club, Centennial, Colorado
    • Tirant aux côtés de sa coéquipière Emily Hibbs au Belmont Shooting Complex, Amber a tiré 69ex75 (23, 23, 23) en qualification pour atteindre la finale.

      Emily a égalé le score d'Amber, ce qui a laissé le duo anglais à égalité à la quatrième place avant la finale.

      S'exprimant après avoir remporté l'argent, Amber a déclaré: "C'était une finale incroyable et je suis très heureux de repartir avec une médaille d'argent. Je viens d'être à la Coupe du Monde au Mexique où j'ai obtenu une médaille de bronze, alors je gagne lentement les médailles!

      " Ambre a prospéré dans la finale et a clairement apprécié l'atmosphère, mais elle n'a pas pu égaler Andri Eleftheriou de Chypre qui a tiré 52ex60 pour prendre l'or.

      Elle a ajouté: "La pression est toujours là pendant les finales, mais je l'appréciais tout simplement. La foule était vraiment derrière nous et avec la musique qui passait, je me sentais détendu. "Vous savez toujours où vous devez être en finale et vous ne pouvez pas vous empêcher de voir l'écran massif sur le côté de vous avec tous les chiffres. Mais vous ne pouvez pas trop en avoir dans votre tête et j'essaie de l'utiliser comme un positif.

      " Emily a terminé à une cinquième place crédible et a tiré 24ex30 avant d'être éliminée. Le résultat marque un exploit fantastique pour Emily tirant à ses premiers Jeux du Commonwealth.

      Commentant sur le tir aux côtés d'Emily, Amber a déclaré: "C'était tellement agréable d'avoir un coéquipier dans la finale avec moi et elle a tiré incroyable.

      C'est ses premiers Jeux du Commonwealth et c'est fantastique de revenir à la cinquième place. Elle est certainement une à surveiller pour l'avenir. "
      Tirant aux côtés de sa coéquipière Emily Hibbs au Belmont Shooting Complex, Amber a tiré 69ex75 (23, 23, 23) en qualification pour atteindre la finale.

      Emily a égalé le score d'Amber, ce qui a laissé le duo anglais à égalité à la quatrième place avant la finale.

      S'exprimant après avoir remporté l'argent, Amber a déclaré: "C'était une finale incroyable et je suis très heureux de repartir avec une médaille d'argent. Je viens d'être à la Coupe du Monde au ... See more
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      Amber Hill gagne la médaille d'argent !
    • Anglais Freddie Killander et Jack Fairclough ont terminé respectivement quatrième et dernier au dernier match du Skeet masculin aux Jeux du Commonwealth, lundi 9 avril. Les deux ont tiré superbement en qualification, avec Jack passant par le dernier tiers classé ayant tiré 122ex125 et Freddie classé quinzième après avoir marqué 119ex125.

      Il y avait un fort contingent britannique dans le dernier six hommes, avec quatre des tireurs représentant les nations d'accueil.

      Le Gallois Ben Llewellin et Gareth McAuley d'Irlande du Nord se sont joints à Jack et Freddie lors de la finale avec Smit Singh de l'Inde et Georgios Achilleos de Chypre. Le duo anglais a été un peu déçu de la finale, les deux ayant manqué des médailles.

      Jack a été éliminé à la cinquième place après avoir tiré 27ex30, alors que Freddie a tiré 37ex40 pour terminer quatrième. Freddie a admis que c'était une pilule amère à avaler après avoir atteint la finale et ne pas avoir gagné de médaille: «C'est un rêve devenu réalité de représenter votre pays dans un si bel endroit. une finale et non une médaille est vraiment difficile ...

      La compétition a été excellente, tout le monde a bien tiré et je ne l'ai pas encore fait aujourd'hui. " En revenant sur sa compétition, Jack a ajouté: "Ma qualification était excellente, et à la fin, je ne pensais pas que je ne pourrais plus le faire et j'attendrai avec impatience cette vie heureuse." Avec l'aide de Gareth et Ben, ils ont tous deux obtenu une médaille.

      Gareth a terminé 45x50 pour prendre la médaille de bronze, laissant Ben pour pousser Georgios Achilles dans une bataille pour l'or.

      Le 56ex60 de Ben a incité Georgios à produire un record total de 57 matches pour remporter l'or.

      Parlant après avoir obtenu de l'argent, Ben a déclaré: "C'est la première fois que je vais gagner de l'argent - c'est génial."

      "C'était génial d'avoir autant d'athlètes de retour à la maison aujourd'hui, et je voudrais bien dire à tout le monde."
      Anglais Freddie Killander et Jack Fairclough ont terminé respectivement quatrième et dernier au dernier match du Skeet masculin aux Jeux du Commonwealth, lundi 9 avril. Les deux ont tiré superbement en qualification, avec Jack passant par le dernier tiers classé ayant tiré 122ex125 et Freddie classé quinzième après avoir marqué 119ex125.

      Il y avait un fort contingent britannique dans le dernier six hommes, avec quatre des tireurs représentant les nations ... See more
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      FREDDIE ET JACK MANQUENT JUSTE LE SKEET!
    • Fred Le Gall

      "Merci à Laurent Bedet pour sa visite au salon de la chasse et de la faune sauvage de Mantes durant laquelle nous avons signé un contrat de 66 lanceurs pour le Clays Shooting de Sains-lès-Marquion (62).

      Le groupe Laporte est honoré de ce témoignage de confiance et de ce futur partenariat de longue durée.

      Nous sommes enchantés d'avoir encore une fois été sélectionnés pour collaborer sur un grand projet.

      Vous en saurez bientôt plus sur ce stand où chaque détail a été soigné pour que vous puissiez pratiquer votre passion dans des conditions optimales."
      Fred Le Gall

      "Merci à Laurent Bedet pour sa visite au salon de la chasse et de la faune sauvage de Mantes durant laquelle nous avons signé un contrat de 66 lanceurs pour le Clays Shooting de Sains-lès-Marquion (62).

      Le groupe Laporte est honoré de ce témoignage de confiance et de ce futur partenariat de longue durée.

      Nous sommes enchantés d'avoir encore ... See more
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      Salon de la chasse de Mantes la Jolie !
    • Welcome to NSSF’s SHOT Show column, “Working the Show.” Designed to help retailers and range owners of all sizes realize the most from their time and money spent in Las Vegas every year at SHOT Show, “Working the Show” will share how various successful retailers across the country plan for SHOT Week and what they’re looking to accomplish while they’re at the show. After the show, the series examines how these retailers, along with manufacturers and media members, are maintaining contacts, responding to trends, changing their marketing based on their purchases and other follow-up tactics. Of course, a critical part of every plan while visiting SHOT Show should be to stop by the NSSF booth and learn more about your benefits and meet the NSSF team. We look forward to your visit!

      —John McNamara, NSSF Senior Director, Retailer Services

      Sportsman’s Loft in Minot, North Dakota, had an unusual beginning 20 years ago as an antiques dealer. It has since grown into a dedicated gun store that is now a perennial Top 10 seller on GunBroker.

      “We were an antique store and received a catalog, kind of by mistake, that had optics,” explains store manager Tyler Burton, as he describes the store’s bold move and eventual transition. “Our antique shop was called The Attic, which is what our FFL is under. We had a loft area in the store, so we started carrying some of that stuff [optics] upstairs there, and then optics turned into a little more stuff and then some shooting stuff. We got an FFL and … we got our name Sportsman’s Loft because it was up in the loft.”

      With antiques a thing of the past, the Loft’s 4,000 square-foot brick-and-mortar retail store keeps between 3,000 and 4,000 guns in stock, with 2,500 guns on the sales floor. It has seven full-time and two part-time employees. Hours are Monday through Saturday 9:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and, in stark contrast to conventional wisdom, this internet sales giant does not have a website.

      “We just use Facebook and GunBroker,” says Burton, when explaining how the store may have only 5,534 Facebook followers, but ships 30 to 50 packages a day. “We’re shipping out of here every day. UPS picks up here at 4:00 every day, and we load the truck down.”

      A large part of that kind of success comes from the Loft’s post-SHOT Show strategy that Burton says begins pretty much as soon as they get back from the show and get the catalogs and brochures unpacked. Fellow employees are excited about the new products, and together they discuss what each other thinks, what they should order and how many units. Some products the Loft jumps on right away, while information on other, less immediate but still interesting items are stored in a special SHOT Show folder.

      “We keep a file folder of the key things that we thought were neat there,” says Burton. “We jump on the [immediate] stuff, keep that [file] and we’ll flip back through that.”

      Rather than wait until items are in stock to upload those product images to social media, the Loft uploads a couple hundred photos right away so customers can “see the cool stuff that’s coming out” and “what’s neat.” Though they blast out everything cool they saw at SHOT, Burton recognizes there are going to be some buzz-worthy products announced that won’t actually be available until the following year.

      “I don’t know how many calls I get about the Hudson 9mm handgun,” laughs Burton about the striker-fired, 1911-like handgun everybody saw last year at SHOT but few have seen since. “We post new products and people will message us about it,” says Burton about how he uses social media to make sales. The Loft has a fairly quick, 100-percent response rate to Facebook users commenting in the store’s posts. “If they still have a question, we have them call us, or we’ll call them. Facebook has been pretty decent for us that way, as far as not having a website.”

      “We don’t want to be a pest,” Burton told me, explaining why the Loft doesn’t also use newsletters or blogs to spread the word about what’s in stock. “Our social media does pretty well for us; our big following is on GunBroker. We have a lot of people who follow our site to see the new products there.”

      With new items coming in, Burton says The Loft isn’t shy about blowing out old inventory to make way for it. “If it’s a non-MAP item, we’ll move them out,” he says, cautioning that when he cuts prices really deeply, he limits it to in-store only, because he doesn’t want to kill the market online. “Our inventory is not a collection. We’re here to turn and burn. I have zero attachment to [inventory] at this point,” he says candidly. “If there’s new product coming, it’s time for the old to go.”

      Some of the decisions regarding what new products to stock come from The Loft’s customers. Being a true gun store instead of a generic sporting goods establishment with lots of related lines on the side, Burton says his customers tend to be “gun guys” who are just as knowledgeable and often know more about what’s new than they do. With fairly high and regular store traffic, he adds that customers regularly share images of the newest and most interesting guns and accessories. The folks at The Loft also follow several gun-related social media sites to see what’s new and aren’t shy about spreading the word. “If we see something that’s neat, we’ll definitely share it,” says Burton.

      Every year at SHOT is different for the Loft. Burton says some years they may spend as much as $600,000 on products, while other years it might be as little as $70,000. Regardless the amount, SHOT Show attendance always pays off.

      “SHOT for us is more about contacts. You make the right contact, it pays for that whole trip,” says Burton, as he explains how he knows that no matter what, his team will meet at least one person who is going to make them money. “We keep SHOT Show always in the back of our minds,” he says of the biggest day-to-day take-away from the annual event.

      About the Author
      Warren Berg is a 25-year veteran of the shooting, hunting and outdoors industry. He has penned hundreds of articles under many names for such storied publications as American Rifleman and Field & Stream. He has produced award-winning television programs on personal-defense and has hunted extensively in North America, Europe
      and Africa.

      The post Working the Show: Sportsman’s Loft — Minot, North Dakota appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      Welcome to NSSF’s SHOT Show column, “Working the Show.” Designed to help retailers and range owners of all sizes realize the most from their time and money spent in Las Vegas every year at SHOT Show, “Working the Show” will share how various successful retailers across the country plan for SHOT Week and what they’re looking to accomplish while they’re at the show. After the show, the series examines how these retailers, along with manufacturers and media members, are ... See more
      See more on line
      Working the Show: Sportsman’s Loft — Minot, North Dakota
    • Plus que quelques jours avant l'ouverture du salon !

      Laporte est heureux d'annoncer qu'il participera au salon IWA Outdoor Classics 2018 du 9 au 12 mars.

      Pourquoi ne pas visiter le stand 3-125 pour voir certains de nos tout nouveaux lanceurs dont la célèbre 18 colonnes? Le salon est ouvert tous les jours de 21h à 18h dans le parc des expositions de Nuremberg en Allemagne.

      Les billets sont toujours disponibles sur https://www.iwa.info/fr

      IWA OutdoorClassics peut se targuer d'une histoire à succès qui s'étend sur 45 ans. Sa réputation internationale est le résultat de son importance rapidement établie dans le monde entier et du large éventail de domaines thématiques qu'elle couvre. Ils aident à combler le fossé entre l'artisanat traditionnel et des idées novatrices pour la chasse et les armes à feu de sport de cible, et en plein air et équipement de sécurité. Leurs exposants internationaux présentent une gamme sophistiquée de produits du monde entier.

      En 2017, 87% des visiteurs de l'IWA étaient des décideurs ou impliqués dans les décisions d'achat et d'approvisionnement de leurs entreprises.

      L'année dernière, le salon a présenté plus de 1 504 exposants et a été suivi par 49 253 participants de 119 pays. Afin de faciliter la recherche des marques choisies, des meilleures offres et des centres d'intérêt, le salon a conçu une application pour vous aider. L'application est maintenant disponible sur l'App Store pour Apple et Android.

      Nous avons hâte de vous voir là-bas
      Plus que quelques jours avant l'ouverture du salon !

      Laporte est heureux d'annoncer qu'il participera au salon IWA Outdoor Classics 2018 du 9 au 12 mars.

      Pourquoi ne pas visiter le stand 3-125 pour voir certains de nos tout nouveaux lanceurs dont la célèbre 18 colonnes? Le salon est ouvert tous les jours de 21h à 18h dans le parc des expositions de Nuremberg en Allemagne.

      Les billets sont toujours disponibles sur  ... See more
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      Retrouvez-nous au célèbre salon IWA pour ses 45 ans !
    • The 2018 SHOT Show was full of excitement, product releases and plenty of insider news on the show floor. But did you know that up on the quiet Level 4 of the Sands Expo Center several hundred firearms dealers and business owners were hard at work getting a first-class education on how to improve their business operations, increase their organizational value and expand their outreach and offerings to consumers near and far? And did you know that as an attendee of SHOT Show you had access to it?

      Our annual SHOT Show University, which takes place the day before the SHOT Show exhibit halls open, is a full day of education attended by store managers, owners and the executive staff of some of the smallest to largest retail organizations in our industry. All attend with the desire to bring back fresh perspective and insight on new and emerging concepts for their businesses, as well as brush up on some of the cornerstone components of operating an FFL such as store security and ATF compliance. With more than 18 courses going on throughout the day and two keynote speakers at this year’s University, we can’t cover all the ground you missed at SSU, but following are some of the highlights.

      The day started with a course that was of especially high interest this year, Doug VanderWoude’s presentation “New Range Technologies.” Doug’s talk was an hour-long, interactive seminar providing those who participated with comprehensive ideas on how to get started with a new range, improve an existing range and actionable steps for improvement anyone could implement upon returning home from the show.

      Another popular class was Frank Furness’s talk on “New Media Marketing.” Not only did Furness discuss how to utilize social media to drive consumers to the content you spend so much time developing for your website, he brought along several pieces of affordable technology with which he trained class participants to use to capture and share sought-after material frequently viewed online like product reviews, training and education and the always popular torture-testing videos. Furness advised not to try and sell via social media but to use these short bursts of messaging to grow interest in your brand and do the selling on your website and in your store.

      For FFLs in the startup stage, newly opened FFLs and new-hires to established retailers, a full learning track of four classes was dedicated to an in-depth review of ATF compliance topics such as the 4473 process, NFA rules and regulations and A&D record keeping. And for those more veteran retailers, the Master’s learning track offered discussions on influence leadership and maintaining relevancy — and profits — in today’s ever-shifting retail world.

      This year’s SSU wrapped up with an inspiring and emotional speech from John O’Leary. The telling of his life experiences and lessons learned made for a keynote speech that will not soon be forgotten. O’Leary was also kind enough to stick around for at least an hour after his talk to sign copies of his New York Times Bestselling book, “On Fire,” which was provided to all those who attended the day’s training.

      Beginning the first day the show opens and spanning Tuesday through Thursday of SHOT Week, our Retailer Seminars were jam-packed with fantastic and engaging speakers, critical information and fresh business strategies. The highlight of the week was our ever-popular Town Hall Meeting, led by an expert panel of professionals from both the ATF and FBI/NICS. Staff from these agencies take the opportunity at each SHOT Show to share critical data from the past year and projections for the next year. Their lengthy Q&A session at the end sees robust participation.

      Maj Toure founder of Black Guns Matter speaking at the 2018 Retailer Seminar “Engaging Urban Communities in the 2nd Amendment Fight.”

      Among other Retailer Seminar speakers, NSSF’s own Jim Curcuruto, Director, Research and Market Development, spent over an hour guiding attendees through the wide variety of research reports that NSSF produces, providing a synopsis of how each report can be utilized to make smarter, more profitable business decisions. And in another wildly popular session speaker Maj Toure, founder of the Black Guns Matter movement, wowed the audience with his interactive session on engaging the urban community in the 2nd Amendment fight — indeed, he may have taken the cake as the most impactful seminar of the week. His welcome words enlightened those in attendance to the misinformation and lack of information in urban communities surrounding firearms safety and rights, and provided strategies and tactics on how to engage this sector of Americans. Even after Toure’s presentation was over, dozens of class participants poured into the hallway to keep the conversation going, all hoping to have more success in serving a community they weren’t sure how to reach only an hour prior.

      NSSF staff received a wealth of positive feedback and suggestions from those attending our SHOT Show University and Retailer Seminars. But one point all the participants agreed upon was that every moment spent in these courses was time well spent. If you haven’t attended a SHOT Show University or Retailer Seminar in the past I strongly encourage you to include one, two or several of these courses in your plans for the 2019 SHOT Show, so mark your calendars now.

      The Retailer Services team at NSSF is already at work putting together next year’s programs. Have suggestions for topics you’d like to see covered or speakers you’d think would be valuable to our program? Email me at jmcnamara@nssf.org. Together we can make next year’s educational offerings the best yet!

      The post 2018 Retailer Education Recap — What You Missed! appeared first on NSSF SHOT Show 2018.
      The 2018 SHOT Show was full of excitement, product releases and plenty of insider news on the show floor. But did you know that up on the quiet Level 4 of the Sands Expo Center several hundred firearms dealers and business owners were hard at work getting a first-class education on how to improve their business operations, increase their organizational value and expand their outreach and offerings to consumers near and far? And did you know that as an attendee of SHOT Show you had access to ... See more
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      2018 Retailer Education Recap — What You Missed!
    • Après le salon de l'ATA c'est au tour du Shot Show de se terminer...

      Nous tenons à remercier toute l'équipe du Shot Show pour nous avoir si bien accueillie ainsi que les visiteurs qui se sont intéressés à nos produits phare!

      La 18 colonnes, aura beaucoup plu et suscité l'intérêt et la curiosité, durant ce grand événement See more on line
      Fin du salon du Shot Show !